Bird table

Today’s picture shows the large puddle which is now more or less permanent on the Scholar’s field and sums up our prevailing weather this year rather well.

puddle

It was a possible cycling day but for no good reason I felt very tired in the morning and the weather veered from sunny to rainy and windy so that every time I thought it might be OK for a pedal, black clouds loomed up and every time I sat down to read the papers, the sun came out.  I gave up the unequal struggle in the end and settled down to some concentrated window staring in an effort to record all the different sorts of birds that visited the garden during the morning.

I was surprised by how many it came to.  The resulting photos are not very great but have been put in for the record.

Robin: 09.14
Robin: 09.14
Goldfinch: 09.15
Goldfinch: 09.15
Coal tit: 09.15
Coal tit: 09.15
Chaffinch: 10.10
Chaffinch: 10.10
Lesser redpoll: 10.12
Lesser redpoll: 10.12
Waxwing: 10.13
Waxwing: 10.13
Dunnock (Hedge sparrow): 10.15
Dunnock (Hedge sparrow): 10.15
Blue tit: 10.16
Blue tit: 10.16
Great tit: 10.16
Great tit: 10.16
Crow: 10.18
Rook or Crow (I’m not sure about this): 10.18

 

Greenfinch: 10.19
Greenfinch: 10.19
Jackdaw: 10.23
Jackdaw: 10.23
Blackbird: 10.25
Blackbird: 10.25

Break for coffee.

 

Sparrow: 11.21
Sparrow: 11.21
Siskin: 11.31
Siskin: 11.31

After lunch.

starling: 13.05
starling: 13.05

I caught the waxwing and redpoll on their only visit but all the rest could have been caught more than once.  There may have been others but I didn’t see them.  The only  other bird that I thought that I might have seen today  was the brambling but it has been an infrequent visitor recently.

I went out to check on the last flowers and was surprised to to see two resilient roses and the very last Japanese anemone.

roses and anemone

After lunch, while Mrs Tootlepedal was at a meeting of the Embroiderers Guild, I ventured out for a short walk along the river.

Steps to the river
The steps down to the Esk from George Street caught my eye.

The main purpose of the walk was to check up on a large cotoneaster bush at Clinthead to see if all the berries had been eaten and to check if there were waxwings or redwings there.

Cotoneaster
There were plenty of berries but no birds when I passed it.

I visited an old acquaintance.

Heron
The heron has been practising for Come Dancing (Seven!) This is an incomprehensible cultural reference to readers from abroad.  Sorry.

There a few trees about still showing a bit of colour.

Autumn colour

Luckily there was a game of rugby on the the telly to entertain me when I got home so I was able to sit down and add to my already impressive total of resting time for the day.

I hope I feel a bit perkier tomorrow as I have a full day planned.

The flying bird of the day is a gull from my afternoon’s walk.

flying gull

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

20 thoughts on “Bird table

  1. I love that Heron. I like to think it is always the same one, and he’s definitely got style (Seven!)

    Come on Scotland.

  2. My season for watching them come and go from our feeders here here I am reminded by yours photos to GET READY!

    Love you Heron too!

    Mine will be back once river gets low enough once again

    Eunice

  3. Perhaps you’ll have ice hockey on Scholar’s field this winter. Waste not want not.

    The birds were a treat – my favorites oddly enough being the endearing lesser redpoll and the richly detailed hedge sparrow. Usually I go for acrobatics and dramatic plumage–I’m a fool for the heron–but sometimes I surprise myself.

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