Fairly calm after the storm

CrazyCrane

Today’s guest picture comes from Edward Winter, a blog reader from Sheffield who came to visit us not long ago.  He thinks that his version of Mr Grumpy is quite the equal of ours.  It is called Crazy Crane.  I don’t think it is getting enough to eat.

CrazyCrane

After our hot and humid day yesterday, it was to be expected that a little rain might fall and we were woken up by furious drumming on the roof accompanied by thunder rolling round the hills.

I did the sensible thing and rolled over and shut my eyes again.  By the time that I got in touch with the real world, the rain had stopped and we were able to go out into the garden to assess the damage.  Some things had stood up to the heavy rain pretty well.

dahlia and fuchsia

Some were not too bad….

marigold

…and some had thrown in the towel.

poppy

I am a bit disappointed that Mrs Tootlepedal’s eryngium (Miss Willmott’s ghost) is grey and not blue but on close examination, I can see that it does have a bit of blue in there.

eryngium

It was still pretty soggy outside so I went back in, got my hair cut by my resident barber and then hid until after lunch when the prospects were much better.  The clouds cleared away and with light winds, it looked like a good afternoon for a pedal so I got my cycling gear on and…..

…foolishly stopped for a moment to see how the Tour de France was getting on….

…and two hours later, I finally got on my way.  By this time the wind had got up quite a lot so it served me right for dilly dallying.

My joints were feeling the effects of clambering about on the hillside yesterday so I settled for a short, slow ride with plenty of stops for shots.

The Wauchope was showing where all the rain had gone…

Wauchope cascade

…but the roads were dry and the sun poked through the clouds from time to time. As I went on my way down to Canonbie across the hill, I could look back to see the Monument on the top of Whita where I was walking yesterday.

View of Whita

The tower to the right is a communications mast and quite ugly but we pretend that it isn’t there.

The first part of the route is through sheep and cattle farming country often with rough pasture…

Rough pasture

…and frequent vistas.

Whita

The second part of the route follows the River Esk from Canonbie back to Langholm.

I cross several bridges and I was looking at the lichen on one (as one does) and took a picture out of habit.  When I put it on the computer, I saw that there was an almost invisible fly on the lichen.  Can you spot it in the  left hand frame?  It’s there.

lichen with fly

I passed Gilnockie Tower too.

Gilnockie tower

It is a sixteenth century tower but it was fully restored in 1978 which is why it looks so neat today.

I parked my bike by a fence on the bike path and walked down to the River Esk a mile or two south of the town.

River Esk at Broomholm Island
The two arms of the river coming together after passing round  Broomholm Island

A bright flower beside the river caught my eye.

flower

And there was something even more delightful nearby.

Wild raspberry
The wild raspberries tasted as good as they looked.

Nearer the town, I stopped on Skippers Bridge for the obligatory view of the old distillery.

Langholm Distillery

And since I was in bridge mode, I stopped on the Town Bridge too.

Meeting of the waters

You can see that the Esk on the left has much more water coming down it than the Ewes which shows how local the rain storm over night was.   We were lucky as there are  reports that “gobstopper-sized” hailstones dented cars at Eastriggs which is less than 20 miles away from us.

All in all, apart from the brisk wind, it was a surprisingly mellow day for a gentle pedal after the early thunderstorms.

When I got back, Mrs Tootlepedal was busy in the garden and I took a moment to admire the rambler roses on the fence beside the vegetable garden.

rambling roses

The vegetable garden itself is doing very well and provided runner beans for our lunch and then turnips, potatoes and broad beans for our tea.  Perhaps thanks to a lot of sunshine in June, the vegetables seem to be full of flavour this year.

The flower of the day is a moody shot of a clematis, taken just after the storm abated this morning.

clematis

And in the absence of a flying bird, last night’s full moon, taken before the rain came, will have to do.

full Moon July 2016

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, novice photogrpaher

23 thoughts on “Fairly calm after the storm

  1. The landscapes are beautiful as always, and so are the roses.
    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a fly that small and never on a lichen.
    You’ve reminded me that I haven’t taken a photo of the moon in a long time. That’s a good one.

  2. The roses on the fence by the veg garden are a delightful tangle. Lovely. Also rained here today – after 42ºC humidex the 2 1/2″ of rain in about 30 minutes should not have surprised me – but it did make me even crankier about the stupidly wet and hail-filled summer we’ve had. Worse to be a farmer who’s lost another crop, I know, but I still complain!

  3. I struggle enough with envisaging conventional measurements for things; gobstopper sized hailstones has me beat…it’s been a long time since I spent my pocketmoney on one of those delights – although there are some (mostly those I reside with) who think that’s more the pity 🙂 Mrs T’s rambling rose is gorgeous!

  4. Regarding your invisible communications mast, there are many things I turn a blind eye to in my locality and a few that I ought to notice before including them in my photos. My late mother-in-law’s favourite photo was one she took of her husband with a sign saying ‘Toilets’ just above his head.
    The rambling rose is a picture!

  5. The photos are always a pleasure, and your flowers and countryside looking lovely. Wild raspberries are a treat I used to collect as a youngster, as we had many growing up the hill from us. Our own domestic raspberry patch here died out, but I had two in pots which are now keeping the line going in half-barrels. Slowly rebuilding the herd…

    The fly is tiny, and beautiful. Well camouflaged on the lichen.

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