Apres le deluge, moi

Great Orme

Today’s guest picture shows that Bruce was not just looking at trams on the Great Orme. He was looking at the view of Llandudno too.

Great Orme

After yesterday’s miserable day, we had a very pleasant, warm and often sunny day today.

I didn’t make the most of it but I didn’t entirely waste it.

The better weather certainly encouraged my trigger finger and when I downloaded my camera card onto the computer in the evening, I found that I had taken a lot of pictures.  I ruthlessly pruned them down and discovered that I still had 54 so in the end, the number that appear on this post are just a shadow of the ones that I took.

While Mrs Tootlepedal went off to sing in the church choir, I made a beef and mushroom stew for the slow cooker and mowed the greenhouse grass.  No speed records were broken during this process.

I did have time to admire the rambler roses on the arch…

rambler roses

…and to reflect on the downside of a camera which sees the greenhouse, the whirlygig and the houses beyond while the human eye just sees the roses and ignores the rest.

I walked round to the back of the house to admire the excellent display of flowers along the dam.

Dam flowers

In the garden, the privet is attracting bees and it was quite hard to get a shot without a bee in it.

privet

The sparrows stopped eating Mrs Tootlepedal’s vegetables for a moment or two and started pecking my lawn.

sparrows

There are so many berries on our blackcurrant bush that our neighbour Liz came in and picked a colander full…

blackcurrants

…and then passed them on to another neighbour and came back and picked the same amount again, all without making a serious dent in the number still on the bush.  I will have to make more jelly.

After lunch, we settled down to watch the Tour but I felt a bit guilty about wasting such a good day so I put it on to record and went for a walk.

I went along the Kilngreen seeing sparrow and gull….

sparrow and gull

…and thought that the sparrow will enjoy the blackberries when they ripen.

I walked along the road to Whitshiels and then took the track up through the woods.

The track was covered in self heal and occasionally decorated with ragged robin.

self heal and ragged robin

At the top of the track, I took a picture of a remarkable tree.

Tree with hole in trunk

It is one of a row of three which defy the odds and flourish in spite of having only half a trunk and a tenuous connection to the earth.

tree

I walked onto the rough pasture and and saw a good selection of interesting (to me) things.

meadow pipit, cyclist, pylon

The bird is a meadow pipit which was trying to hide from me, the energetic cyclist was in the process of doing five repetitions of the climb to the White Yett and back down again and the pylon was doing nothing much at all.

I enjoyed the views of course…

Ewes valley
Ewes valley

…and took a panorama to show the extent of them.

ewes panorama
Click to enlarge

You can see why I like being up here on a sunny day.

I walked back across Whita Hill, passing these pretty pink flowers on the way….

pink flowers

…which may be lousewort (I am open to correction of course).

I came back to the town by way of the Kirk Wynd.  I was very distracted by the large number of red soldier beetles doing their best to contribute to the survival of the species.  There seemed to be several on every flower I passed at one point.

red soldier beetles

The Kirk Wynd was very flowery.

trefoil, daisy and bedstraw

rosebay willowherb

At the bottom of the Wynd, I passed the old graveyard wall which is hidden by a metal fence while repairs are being done.  I peeped through a gap.

The wall is supposed to be fully repaired by next week.  This seems like one of those targets which may be missed.

Old Kirkyard wall

I will doff my chapeau to the wall builders if the job is finished on time.

At the bottom of the Wynd, I stepped into the Market place and noticed that the Common Riding bunting is up at the Town Hall.

Town Hall bunting.

The Common Riding will take place on the last Friday in July so we are getting very excited already.

I walked down to the river….

River esk

On the gravel bank below the suspension bridge, a man was making a circular bench out of the river stones.

stone bench on Esk bank

This is a real labour of love as it is very likely that it will either be covered up or swept away by the next flood to come down  the river.

I got home and sat and watched the end of a very exciting stage of the Tour and followed that by eating the beef stew with peas and potatoes from the garden for our tea.  The presence of peas in the meal was a tribute to the fine pea fortress erected by Mrs Tootlepedal.  The sparrows’ frustration was our treat.

After tea, I got out the fairly speedy bike and had a fairly speedy trip down to Canonbie and back by my usual route but in the opposite direction.  It was a lovely evening but the brisk wind made the return part of the journey quite hard work.  Fortunately, I didn’t take my camera with me!

The sitting bird of the day is a blackbird which was keeping an eye on Liz as she picked the blackcurrants.

blackbird on fence

 

 

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

20 thoughts on “Apres le deluge, moi

  1. That’s a great tree. I’ve never seen a stilted tree get so big.
    The panorama was worth clicking. It was a beautiful day and that’s a beautiful scene.
    I can understand the motivation behind building that stone bench. It’s like an oversized jigsaw puzzle and solving the puzzle can become very addicting. I loved building stone walls and I’d bet that he would too. Maybe he has chosen a career and doesn’t realize it yet.

  2. No wonder your trigger finger was working hard on such a lovely day. Impressed by the effort going into the circular bench.

  3. The remarkable tree is truly remarkable, the will to live is something that is amazing to see, yet hard to record.

    I know that I’m repeating myself, but I loved the views of the countryside and all of the flowers. And as always, I liked seeing the historic buildings, in this case, the town hall all decked out for the big event later this month.

  4. The tree looks like it is tenuously dipping toes in to test out footing. Well done on the photo of it and all. BTW,what is that last purple bush before the cemetery shots? It looks like something in our garden yet to be accurately identified. Help? thanks

  5. I love blackcurrants! For the longest time, I wondered why I couldn’t find fresh ones in the US until I read somewhere that they were banned because of some kind of blight. The only way they are sold here is either as jam or preserved in jars. One more thing that I miss about the UK! Wonderful pictures, as always, Tom.

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