Another ferntastic walk

Today’s guest picture was sent to me by Venetia.  It was taken by a friend who saw her kindly trying to cheer an old fellow up at RHS Rosemoor.

Venetia and friend

We woke to a sunny morning and I might have gone cycling but I received a better offer.  Mike Tinker had suggested a walk to look at some early summer ferns  so after breakfast I walked round to his house and started by meeting some of the ferns which he has in his garden.

Mike's garden ferns

He is a real fern enthusiast and as you can see, he has some interesting specimens.

He has many more than I have shown here but I am trying to keep posts shorter than usual for a while.

We set off round the Scholars’ Field and up the track along the river.  We were looking for ferns  but saw other things of interest along the way.

moth

Research tells me that this might be a Chinese Character moth, cilix glaucata with the brown markings supposed to look like bird droppings and put off predators.  I would be happy to be corrected if I am wrong.

But we did see a lot of ferns and it is always interesting to turn a fern and see what is on the other side.

female fern
A lady fern, more delicate than the male
buckle fern
A buckler fern.  You can see the buckle shaoped sporangia

There was no shortage of ferns to see.

fern

We passed the Duchess Bridge and took the path up through the woods.

Walk 2

Mike kept an eye out for wild flowers to show me.

sanicle
This is sanicle

I saw ferns that I never knew existed.

beech fern
A beech fern
oak fern
An oak fern

We looked at the back of more ferns.

shield fern

When we came out onto the road at the end of the path, it was not hard to spot a maidenhair spleenwort or two…

spleenwort wall

…and evergreen polypody ferns of the sort that we had seen on our earlier walk.

polypody

We walked back along the road and saw more wild flowers.

Avens
These are wood and water avens.
herb ribert and yellow pimpernel
And Herb Robert and a Yellow Pimpernel

Mike is an excellent guide and knows a lot about ferns and wild flowers and I would have liked to have spent more time and tried to take better pictures (the low light under the trees made things tricky) but I had made an arrangement to take my new bicycle down to the bike shop in Carlisle for its post sales service and as I wanted to take it home with me, I needed to be there in good time.

Mrs Tootlepedal came down with me and we enjoyed a light lunch and did some heavy shopping before picking up the bike again and heading home.

There was enough time when we got back for Mrs Tootlepedal to do some gardening and I did think of a short bike ride but the brisk breeze, uncooperative legs and the need to keep on track with my archive work sent me inside to put another week of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database.

I did emerge in time to thin some of the hundreds of gooseberries from the gooseberry bush.  I stewed them and had them with custard as a pudding for my evening meal (Mrs Tootlepedal had rhubarb and custard).  Considering that the gooseberries were like bullets when I picked them, they softened well and tasted remarkably good so I may well thin some more tomorrow.

There isn’t really a flower of the day today but I was pleased to see that the bumble bees share my fondness for astrantias.

bees on astrantia

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, novice photogrpaher

19 thoughts on “Another ferntastic walk

  1. I really liked this look at the ferns that grow in your area, but that was because you photographed them so well! We have many species of ferns here, but my photos of them always come up short. I liked the flowers too, of course, and I have to say that it must be nice to have some one knowledgeable along with you as you’re photographing both the flowers and ferns.

  2. The shots of the ferns are excellent! I’d like to take a walk with Mr. Tinker myself, every day for a year or two.
    I like the Chinese Character moth. I think it’s pretty.
    I’be never heard of the Yellow Pimpernel. It reminds me of our yellow loosestrifes.

  3. First you encourage me to show an interest in lichens and mosses, now it’s ferns. This tired old brain will never sort out half the names and varieties (I can’t even always tell a lichen from a moss), but I keep trying! It’s good for the brain cells I’m told. Who ever would have thought of looking on the undersides of ferns? We have so many of them growing here, but they all tend to look pretty much alike to me.

    1. I can’t remember the names but it is interesting to see how many different varieties there are of everyday plants that might all look the same to the casual eye. I am trying to learn to look more closely.

  4. How fortunate to have a fern enthusiast with you whilst you took those great photos…really interesting and helpful. Maths is not my strong subject so my comment yesterday about anniversaries was a couple of years out!

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