Spirits and mist lifted

Today’s guest picture shows a Nottingham Inn dating from 1493 which my brother Andrew passed on his way to the university there.

Nottingham 1493

It was calm and dry when I got up but it wasn’t warm.  John in the shop called it ‘fresh’ and my neighbour Liz called it ‘snell’ and at a miserly 6°C when I set off on my bicycle, I agreed with both of them and had to be well wrapped up.  I had remembered to pick up the key for the camera club meeting in the evening and this had given me an excuse to let the temperature rise a bit but it was still cold enough to make me glad of every layer that I was wearing.

I had had reports that there had been a landslip along the road to Lockerbie and indeed, I passed a sign saying ‘road closed ahead’ as I left the town.  I went to have a look.

Lockerbie road landslip

Not a pretty sight!

One of our other local roads has been closed for years after a landslip so everyone will hope that there is a bit more action in this case as it is a well used road.

I didn’t go any further along the road but turned back and went over the hill past the Bloch.  I was anxious to see whether there were signs that the sun would come out later in the day so I looked at the clouds ahead of me…

cloudscape

…and behind me…

cloudscape 2

…and wondered if I was going in the right direction.

When I got to the top of the hill, I could look down on the Solway which was the intended destination of my ride.

mist over solway

That wasn’t water that I was looking at, it was a blanket of mist…

mist over solway 2

…shrouding the English shore.

Still, mist rises in my experience so I pedalled on down to Gretna Green where a piper in full rig….

Gretna piper

…was cheerfully waiting to have his picture taken with a happy couple who had been just married at the Old Blacksmith’s Shop and were posing under a handy sculpture nearby.

happy couple

By the time that I got to the English side of the Solway, the mist had disappeared…

Solway moss at Burgh

…but sadly the sea had gone too.

I was puzzled once more by a roadside sign which says: When the water reaches this point maximum depth is 2 feet.

Solway moss at Burgh 2

I have never been able to work out quite what it means but as the tide always seems to be out when I cycle here, it hasn’t mattered.

In the absence of any sea to photograph, I turned inland and circled round to make my way home.  Although I was now heading into the wind, it was so light that I was able to keep my average speed up all the way back to Langholm.

I stopped for a picture or two on the way.  This road near Rockcliffe turns sharply right just ahead so I suppose this qualifies as a colourful corner…

colourful corner rockcliffe

…and although I hadn’t seen any geese in the fields on my way down to the Solway, I saw plenty in the pond at Longtown on my way back.

geese at Lontwon pondgeese at Lontwon pond 2

I took an autumn colour shot at Irvine House…

irvine house

…but resisted the urge to take yet another Skippers Bridge shot and got home after 62 miles feeling tired but happy.

I had time for a quick walk round the garden in the sun…

garden flowers Oct 15
Cheerful survivors
little white flower
A very pretty little white flower in thee back border
BENCH SUBMERGED BY NASTURTIUM
There’s a bench under there somewhere

…and a look at the birds…

CHAFFINCHES ON FEEDER
It was mainly a chaffinch day at the feeder
open and shut chaffinches
They came in open and shut versions.

…before I had to sit down and choose 15 pictures to show at the camera club meeting in the evening.

Then Luke came for his flute lesson and I passed on some of the insights into breathing that I had got from my singing lesson.  They apply to flute playing too.

The camera club meeting went well, with 10 members turning up and some very interesting images to look at.  We are going to try some portrait photography at our next meeting.  I hope to learn a lot as portraits are not my strong point, to say the least.

Mrs Tootlepedal returns tomorrow so whatever the weather holds, it will be a bright, bright day.

The flying chaffinches of the day are once again gender balanced.

FLYING FEMALE CHAFFINCH

flying male chaffinch

 

 

 

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

28 thoughts on “Spirits and mist lifted

  1. Keep up the excellent, as ever work. I believe much of the art of portraiture is to get the subject relaxed, like good conversations with friends relax one?

  2. Glad you have Mrs T returning tomorrow. Your landslide does look unpleasant. We’ve had a rather testing time with the floods in the Aude yesterday. After a stressful evening, we are now surrounded by water but the house and car survived. Thousands of others weren’t so lucky.

  3. I’m always impressed by the distances you ride on some of your excursions, 62 miles is well past what I’d be able to do on a bike. I loved the photos that you shot though, along with the cheerful survivors and the flying chaffinches.

    1. The biking distances are just a product of having enough time to take things easily. I admire the people who go out and do big distances after a working day.

  4. I have some rather extended experience with landslips (we call them landslides). Would it be OK if I bragged about how ours are a bit more exciting since the road is carved out in the cliffs that drop straight into the Pacific Ocean?Ours is a well used highway that runs from the Mexican border to Canada’s. One section in southern California was closed for close to a year because of several major slips/slides. Just can’t mess with Mother Nature.
    Happiness is a returning Mrs T. Enjoy!

    1. You are naturally permitted to mention the size of your landslips. The great thing about living here is the modest scale of our natural disasters for which we are very grateful.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

The Tiny Potager

Mindful, Seasonal Living in Middle England - with a family of seven

Ohio History & Travel

You can find a rich experience close to home.

That and a little bit of this

My name is Meg and in my blog I share my thoughts and philosophy of life and faith.

Occasional Adventures

A record of our travel adventures

Something Over Tea

Scribbles from my notebook

Reclaiming Paradise

Tales from an organic gardener

Movin' on

Meandering with camera...

Notes From the Hinterland

A blog about nature, home, community, books, writing, the environment, food, and rural life.

PedalWORKS

Don’t ride where you drive

quercuscommunity

Life after the Care Farm

Lletty's Blog

Croeso! Welcome to Lletty Cottage a lovely five star holiday cottage for two in Carmarthenshire. www.llettycottage.co.uk

The Geek Homestead

Homesteading, homeschooling, gardening and baking with some geeky hobbies thrown in

Klarinet

Simple life with cacti

Salmon Brook Farms

Official Home of Lavinia and Rick Ross

rambling ratz

Rambling and bimbling around Herefordshire: mostly Credenhill Wood

thegardenimpressionists

Outside musings from our garden in Carmarthenshire

%d bloggers like this: