One step forward and two steps back

Today’s guest picture is another brightener for a gloomy day from Venetia.  She was much struck by the glow from a neighbour’s flame tree in Somerset this morning.

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There was not much brightness here today at all and it rained sporadically and unpredictably off and on all day.

I started the day by putting another week of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database and felt pretty pleased to be getting very near the bottom of the pile of waiting forms.

Then we entertained Sandy to a cup of coffee and followed that by going off to see an exhibition which he had helped to set up in the Social Club in the town.

It was a worth a visit.

To mark the centenary of the ending of the Great War, local schoolchildren have done an enormous amount of research into how the war had affected Langholm.  They had produced pen portraits and where possible, photographs of the many casualties of the war and it was shocking to see a map of the town with every affected household marked in red.  There were streets where it seemed that almost every house had suffered loss and the exhibition really brought home the extent of the damage to the town and its people.  It affected me more than any other memorial I have seen over recent weeks and made the bellicose posturings of many of today’s politicians even harder to bear.

I turned to the birds when we got home for a bit of cheer.

Goldfinches were back…

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…but not in great numbers so there was plenty of room for chaffinches too.

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Some visitors raised an eyebrow at the quality of the food on offer…

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…but others got stuck right in.

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Once again we were blessed with several coal tits, both in the plum tree…

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…and off the plum tree on their way to the feeder…

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…and having a snack when they got there.

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My joy at getting near to the bottom of my pile of newspaper data sheets was greatly tempered by finding that Nancy, our head data miner, had kindly dropped off another four weeks of the newspaper index to build the pile up again.  Ah well, we are getting near the end of another year (1898) and the 20th century beckons.

I had had a short pedal on the bike to nowhere after breakfast and as it was raining again after lunch, I had another short pedal then too.  Of course it cleared up as soon as I got off the bike so I thought that I would risk a short walk to somewhere to go with the cycling to nowhere.

This was not a great idea as it started to rain again soon after I left home and my leg thought that I had done more than enough already so I turned and came home after only a few hundred yards, walking with a pronounced limp (L.I.M.P….pronounced limp, folks © Spike Milligan).

I passed some points of interest (to me) on my brief outing.

The peltigera lichen is enjoying the weather even if I am not.

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And having shown the dam along the back of our house a few days ago, I though I might show the sluice which controls the flow into the dam from the pool at Pool Corner.

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It may not look much but it was doing a good job of holding back the water which was pouring over the caul.

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Like the photographer, the larches at Pool Corner are showing the passing of time and their golden branches have got thin on top, the gold fading to silver.

 

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When I got home from my curtailed outing, I put another week of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database and practised some singing so the day was by no means wasted.

The early evening was improved by the arrival of Luke for our weekly fluting session and we tootled away merrily.

The flying bird of the day is one of the coal tits.  They are very nippy little birds so getting a good flying shot on a gloomy day is very hard and I couldn’t get a better one than this.

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Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

25 thoughts on “One step forward and two steps back

  1. I wish our peltigera lichens fruited like yours do. I’ve never seen one do that.
    I like that shot of the larches in the sunshine.
    Too bad the leg held you up. I hope it will return to normal soon. I’ve had sciatica in my leg before and that kind of pain is like a weight.

  2. Well done Sandy and everyone involved. it is often the simplicity that is touching
    The research, and each piece of work personal.

  3. Such a moving description of the exhibition. For too many politicians, war is abstract, something that happens “over there.” Nothing abstract about so many households being affected. Those little coal tits look so much like our chickadees. I will try to get a picture of a chickadee soon. (Not easy with my wee camera.) I just learned an amazing fact about chickadees and hope to write a post about it. We shall see!

  4. I applaud who ever it was that came up with the idea of the map with the red markers on it, we often lose sight of the local impacts of large events, and just reading the numbers doesn’t impact us the way the visual representation of the map would.

  5. Love the coal tit pictures, they don’t hang about for long at our feeder so you are very lucky to get those shots. We have much the same weather here as you although we were lucky as we didn’t get the rain!

  6. interesting about the effects of war on Langholm. I watched a programme on what was known as shell shock – now PTSD. It was the first time I think I understood my late FIL must have been suffering from the condition all his life but it was undiagnosed

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