Scones, scuttling around and singing

Today’s guest picture is another from our son Tony’s walk round the Wemyss Estate.  As well as a parakeet in a tree, he came across a curious deer which was looking a bit lost.

wemyss deer

We were visited by storm Diana today.  I must say that the practice of giving passing weather fronts a name is obviously a bad idea.  They are getting ideas above their station and we got a lot of rain and some stiff winds in the afternoon.

It wasn’t too bad in the morning when Dropscone came round for coffee.  Sandy dropped in to pick up some keys for the new archive centre but he was busy and didn’t stay for coffee.  This meant that Dropscone and I could eat all the scones which was a stroke of luck as the scones were particularly tasty today.

Although it was raining lightly as Dropscone left, the forecast said that it would stop raining by twelve o’clock and then start again by one.  As it did actually stop raining at three minutes to twelve, I went out for a short three bridges walk.

I was detained for a moment by some cheerful calendulas in the garden before I left.

calendulas end of november

The clouds had lifted on the hills and I could almost see the monument.

misty monument

There was a touch of colour in the last willows which are fading away beside the town bridge.

last willow

And some of our resident ducks had found a calm spot for a paddle above the bridge.

floating ducks

I was very impressed by the amount of hay being transported by a single driver from the arable east coast to the pastoral west.

big hay

I passed more evidence of the activity of the Langholm Walks volunteers who have been putting new discs onto the walks signposts.

Langholm Walks signs
Walkers are spoiled for choice

The group is trying hard to encourage walkers to come to the town and sample the many delights of walking in our woods and hills.

As I went along the Lodge Walks, I discovered that the forecast had only said that it would have started raining by one o’clock.  It didn’t say when it would actually start and that turned out to be at about ten past twelve so I didn’t get very far on my walk before the rain came down.  Luckily I was well armed (or legged) with welly boots and a large golf umbrella.  As I was sheltered from the worst of the wind and there was plenty to look at, I still had a good walk.

I saw berries by a wall…

lodge walks berries

…and lichen on a tree…

lodge walks lichen

…as I went up the Lodge Walks.

Then as I crossed the Castleholm, I saw a tree with many, many branches…

castleholm bare tree

…a soggy gate…

soggy castleholm gate

…and a tree stump with a mixture of fungus and fallen leaves which were so well matched for colour that it was hard to tell them apart.

castleholm fungi and leaves

Round the back of the stump, there were more clear cut fungi.

castleholm fungi

As I walked back along the path to the Jubilee Bridge, I could see many hazel catkins…

castleholm catkin

…but by the time that I got to the bridge, the rain was coming down so steadily that I put my camera back in my pocket and concentrated all my energies on not letting my brolly get blown away by the wind.

By the time that I got home, it was a thoroughly miserable day and so dark and gloomy that I didn’t bother to get my bird watching camera out at all.

After lunch, I put a week of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database and practised some singing for my various choirs.

Mrs Tootlepedal made another delicious evening meal and fortified by that, I ventured out into the wind and the rain to go to a Langholm Sings choir practice.  Some of the work that I had done in the afternoon turned out to be quite useful.

It had stopped raining by the time that we came out of the practice and this was just as well as the river was high and flowing fast as I crossed the suspension bridge.  We are promised more heavy rain tomorrow so riverside dwellers may be getting a bit nervous.

I didn’t try for a flying bird of the day today and a rather fuzzy perching gull is standing in for the position instead.

perching gull

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

25 thoughts on “Scones, scuttling around and singing

  1. Hazel catkins: promise of Spring to come.
    Where are hay lorries on the scale which includes timber lorries, in terms of clogging up the roads?

    1. The are a nuisance to get behind but in general there are not nearly so many of them and they tend to be seasonal whereas the log lorries thunder around all year.

  2. The berries against the wall are a beautiful spot of colour – something you surely needed after a wet and gloomy day. It’s a treat to see all the green grass.

  3. That is a wonderous load of hay! I agree re: naming weather events. Somehow, once it has been bestowed a moniker, it is all so much more violent than “a dismal, wet, and windy day”.

  4. I, too, would need no encouragement to visit your lovely town, but sometimes a little nudge is what is needed to encourage visitors. I’ve seen it happen in central Maine, and it really does work. Good timing with the walk!

      1. We are on the very edge of our administrative region so the tourist board would prefer people to head for the centre of the region and no to place where they might go off into someone else’s territory. As a result they have never promoted us well.

  5. Glad you took advantage of the very short window of opportunity. Wish those Langholm volunteers would visit us and put some signs up in our nearby natural park. 250 hectares of wonderful walks but not a sign for anyone but mountain bikers. We’ve had some slightly longer walks than intended 😉

  6. You proved Wainright correct that there’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing! Enjoyed your wet walk photos and all the treasures you uncovered.

  7. It was nice to see any flowers this time of year, and I also enjoyed the shiny fungi a lot as well. You didn’t mention your leg bothering you, so I assume that it has mended properly by now.

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