Quiet satisfaction

Today’s guest post comes from my brother Andrew’s trip to Anglesey.  He and my sister Mary had a coffee while admiring this view of Puffin Island.  The bell in the lighthouse tolled every 20 seconds while they sipped but Andrew told me not to ask for whom the bell tolled.

puffin island anglesey

It is a short post today because although I did quite a lot, it almost all involved sitting down and singing, with the church choir in the morning and with the Carlisle Community Choir in the afternoon.

When I wasn’t sitting singing, I was mainly just sitting as the wind was even colder and meaner today than it was yesterday and there was no mitigating sunshine to cheer things up.

I might have gone for a walk or even a cycle ride between choirs, but with my foot still giving me trouble as a result of recent cycle rides and the wind seeking out every crevice in my clothing, neither option seemed very attractive so I stayed in, had a coffee, and watched the birds

There were plenty of goldfinches to watch….

lots of goldfinches

…though chaffinches were falling over themselves to get at the seed.  (I love it when a figure of speech comes to life.)

chaffinch pile up

The flock of siskins which has been visiting seems to have moved on and I only saw one or two today.  In their place, a number of redpolls have started coming regularly  I was just about to photograph a full house of redpolls when a chaffinch barged in and took the fourth perch..

three redpolls

…and the dislodged redpoll had to go to the other feeder.  The bright red chest is the  plumage of the male.

redpoll with red breast

I did get out as far as the garden but the cold weather meant that there was not much development to record.  Indeed the cold and the wind had battered one tulip badly before it had even opened its petals properly.

battered tulip

Near the pond, red primroses and blue grape hyacinths jostled each other for position

primrose and grape hyacincths

In the pond itself, marsh marigolds have come out.

marsh marigolds

The trout lilies are doing well but are hanging their heads in the chill and since I couldn’t be bothered to go in and fetch a mirror, I cheated and held one up to show the pretty flower.

trout lily

I soon went back in and when I got bored of looking at the birds, I looked at the packed flower beds round the feeder instead.

flowwers below feeder

We fitted a little shopping in when we went to Carlisle to sing after lunch.  Mrs Tootlepedal bought some bark chippings for mulch and I bought a small teapot (and some loose tea) so we were both satisfied.

At church in the morning, we had sung six hymns, a short introit and an anthem, followed by two goes through the Hallelujah Chorus as a practice for the service next week so I was more than pleased to find that I still had a voice to sing in the afternoon.  Our Carlisle conductor is so cheery and encouraging, and the music that she has chosen is so enjoyable to sing that all thoughts of sore toes and cold winds were banished from my mind.

I had made a ragu sauce with mince in the slow cooker before church and it went down well with some linguine when we got back from Carlisle, leaving us enough time to watch the final holes of the Masters Golf.

Altogether it was a day of good quality sitting around.

The flying bird of the day is a goldfinch.  (I have cheated and painted out the feeder that it was just about to land on.)

flying goldfinch

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, novice photogrpaher

19 thoughts on “Quiet satisfaction

  1. I like that shot of the primroses and grape hyacinths. It’s a pleasing color combination.
    I found some marsh marigolds last year but I can’t seem to find them now. Seeing posts with them in them remind me to have another look.
    I hope the foot benefits from the day of rest.

  2. Sorry I have been away from blogging for a bit. It is good to see what is going on in Langholm again, and I trust the tadpoles are doing well in the ponds.

    I do hope your foot feels better soon. Thank you for posting the marsh marigold photo. I remember them from childhood. It was one of the first plants I learned to identify.

    Our fruit trees are now starting to bloom, and I should be able to get some good photos eventually.

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