A surprise

Today’s guest picture is another from the East Wemyss riviera where the sun always shines it seems.  Our son Tony sent us this shadowy portrait of one of his dogs.

shadowy wemyss dog

The run of cool, dry weather continued today and we needed a coat to keep us warm as we cycled to church after breakfast to sing in the choir.  There was a very good attendance as it was a baptism service, the second in a row.  To my surprise, our ex-minister Scott came down from Glasgow to conduct the service.  It was a great pleasure to meet him again and I was very envious when he told me that he had taken part in an 85 mile cycle sportive yesterday.  He was feeling rather stiff as he has not had the opportunity to a lot of training but he managed very well when he was left holding the baby during the baptism.

After we got home, I had a cup of coffee and a walk round the garden.  My feet had been very sore yesterday so I put Sunday to good use by making it a day of rest today and the walk round the garden was as far as I went.

The cool weather has put growth on hold but there are occasional signs of what is to come and the apple blossom is doing well regardless.

four red-pink flowers

I always like nature’s attention to geometry and my eye was caught by the diagonals on the Solomon’s seal…

solomons seal diagonals

…and the design of the cow parsley.

cow parsley geometry

One rhododendron bud remained tightly furled..

rhododendron bus

…while another had opened up to interested visitors.

inside a white rhododendron

A Welsh poppy didn’t look as though it had attracted any pollinators yet…

welsh poppy may

…and the garden did not have many bees about at all.

One plant that is enjoying the weather is the Lithodora which has never looked so good.

lithodora May

It did attract a bee but it flew off before I could catch it on camera.

Pulsatillas are rewarding little flowers because not only are they pretty when in bloom, but they also look rather dashing when their seed heads appear.

pulsatilla seed head

I didn’t stay out long as it was rather chilly.

The feeder was busy again and goldfinches and siskins were playing copycat.  First it was ‘who could give the best sideways look’…

sideways glances

…and then it was ‘who could stand up straightest’.

standing up straight contest

Some birds were bad losers and resorted to violence.

goldfinch arrowing in on siskin

A sparrow made an attempt to get some seed and got the usual cheery welcome from a siskin.

flying sparrow unwelcome

After lunch we went off to Carlisle in the zingy little white thingy.   As it is an electric car and we are new to driving it, we spend a lot of time watching the meter which tells you how many theoretical miles you have left in the battery and comparing it to how many miles we have actually done..

This encourages very smooth driving with a light touch on the accelerator.  It is early days yet but if the battery continues to behave, it looks as though we will have  a range of comfortably over 100 miles as long as we are not in a hurry.  This is all we need for our normal use.

When we got home after another excellent afternoon’s singing with our Carlisle choir, we plugged the car into the wall socket and it was feeding time at the Zoe.

feeding time at the zoe

As the plug goes right into the nose of the car, it feels a lot like putting a nosebag on a horse after a hard day pulling a carriage.

The flying bird of the day is the sparrow, still trying to find a way to get some seed.

flying sparrow

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, novice photogrpaher

27 thoughts on “A surprise

      1. For Clif and me, it could never be boring. Your post had both of us in a flutter, and Clif had to do some research on your car. He’s like that. 😉

  1. From what you say, the zingy little white thingy should prove to be an ideal car for your use. What kind of regular maintenance does an electric car require? I am intrigued by the names Renault has for its models!

    1. Zoe in this case may well derive from ZerO Emission and is not just cute. The car will need an annual service. It is much simpler than an ICE but it still has brakes, suspension and steering, not to mention a lot of wires to check.

  2. I used to have “range anxiety” when I started riding my e-bike. A spare battery has cured that and in eco mode I get about 70 miles per charge. DH rides his without assistance a lot of the time and he still hasn’t run out of “juice” when we go out.

  3. Beautiful diagonals from the Solomon’s seal. I particularly like the blue of your Lithodora. I grew one along a wall a long time ago, but it was a noticeably darker shade of blue. I really, really like your zippy new car! The distances we often drive far exceed 100 miles or I’d be in line for one of those cute little electric buggies! May you enjoy many happy miles with it.

  4. Look what happens when I miss some posts! A shiny new car plugged in and all ready to whizz you off to new pastures and a garden full of colourful delights…good to catch up on all the goings on!

      1. All is well here. We’ve been to Canada to visit our son and his family- such a wonderful experience but missing the grandchildren now!

  5. A chilly 4c on Saturday morning, and the roads had been gritted. We have concerns about how an electric car would manage our hills without gobbling up the power. We’d like to have one though.

    1. Going up hills and cold weather eat up the charge at an alarming rate (though you do get some back going down the hills again). The key seems to be not to need to go fast which can be a problem if people come up behind you when it is hard for them to pass. It is exciting at the moment as we get to know the car. The torque is amazing and if you were in that sort of mood, you could leave boy racers for dead getting away form a traffic light.

  6. I’m still impressed by the variety of flowers that Mrs. T grows in the gardens, and they’re all beautiful in their own way! Your birds are as entertaining as ever as well.

    Congratulations on the new car! I think that it will serve you very well, and more reliably than your old one.

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