Norwegian weather

Today’s guest post is another from Joyce’s Bermuda collection.  As well as glorious beaches she visited the zoo at Flatt Island where she found this lovely lemur.

ring tailedlemur flatts village aquarium

When we woke up, we were very pleased to find the Norwegian weather forecast had been reliable and we had a second sunny day in succession.  What was even more satisfactory was that there was no sign of the strong winds with which we had been threatened so it was as good a day as one could reasonably expect in early February.

We had to wait in for the gas man to come and service our boiler so I had time to admire the smash and grab technique of the robin…

smash and grab robin

…and cycle to the corner shop, passing an oyster catcher on the way.

oyster catcher on gravel

When I got home again, there were starlings on every side.

There was one on top of Irving’s holly tree and one  on top of the walnut tree …

starling on walnut and holly

…and when I went round the back of the house to investigate loud twittering, I found many more starlings in a bush at the back of Henry Street. (There were noisy sparrows in there too.)

starlings back henry street

While the gas boiler inspection was going on, I walked round the garden.

The crocuses had opened to greet the sunshine…

first open crocus

…and there were signs of life all over the place.

wallflower, euphorbia, crocus, magnolia

In defence of the often criticised service industries, I have to report that the gas engineer came on time, did the job cheerfully and quickly, and went on his way with a smile.

Mrs Tootlepedal had a busy morning at the computer on the proposed community land purchase business and she had more to do after lunch.  While she slaved away, I took the opportunity to test my cycling head to see if there was any dizziness still in it.

I got the slow bike out because it has wide handlebars for a steadier grip and it doesn’t have toe clips on the pedals so if I needed to stop quickly, I could put my foot down immediately.  I cycled at a very sensible pace so that I wouldn’t put pressure on my breathing. As a result, I enjoyed the outing.

It was still a lovely day…

field near Bloch

…and I stopped after three miles for a little rest and a chance to view a favourite cascade on the Wauchope Water.

I took a bird’s eye view from above…

Wauchope Schoolhouse cascade from above

…and a trout’s eye view from below.

Wauchope Schoolhouse cascade from below

I turned up the Cleuchfoot road and followed the Logan Water for a mile.

Logan Water

I looked politely at the lichen on the wall when I parked my bike for that photo.

wall lichen

In the end, I managed ten miles in just over an hour and got home without having to stop for a dizzy spell.  This was most satisfactory and if the weather stays friendly, I will try to go a little further tomorrow.

Mrs Tootlepedal had finished her work by the time that I got back, and she kindly agreed to forgo a gardening opportunity and come for a walk with me instead.

We went along the Lamb Hill….

Lamb Hill tree

…and on to the road to Newcastleton.

There is a gap in the trees there which gives a fine view up the Ewes valley.  I like the way that the hills meet each other on the diagonal just as a child might draw hills in a colouring book..

view from Copshaw road

We walked up the road and then took the path across the lower slopes of Whita which leads to Whita Well.   We couldn’t see much ahead of us as we were walking straight into the sun but when we stopped and looked back, we were well rewarded for our little climb.

ewes valley from Whita

After a soggy start, the path across the hill became very acceptable.

grass path on Whita

Above us, we could see the monument pointing out where to look to find the moon.

monument and point

When we got to Whita Well, we came to the bench which kind people have put there for the convenience of elderly walkers who are in need of a sit down.

We sat down.

bench at whita well

We were well sheltered from the light breeze, and it was a great treat after so many damp and gloomy days to sit in the sun and take in the rays.

As we walked back down to the town, we passed a good show of gorse, though it wasn’t warm enough to generate the coconut scent that gorse has in summer.

gorse at whita well

We also passed this sign at the top of the golf course.

helicopter warning sign

It was laid flat on the ground though as the helicopter wasn’t flying today.

We got home after two and a half miles of quite hard work and were very happy to have a sit down, a cup of tea, and several slices of fruity malt loaf which doubtless more than made up for any calories we might have expended while going up the hill.

Although the atmospheric pressure is due to stay high tomorrow, we might find ourselves in some misty conditions and the temperature might be low enough for a morning frost.  Looking at the BBC weather forecast for the temperature in the afternoon, I find it is two degrees better than the Norwegian offering, so I will opt for the BBC this time.

The slow cooked lamb stew made a third and final appearance for tea, this time in the guise of a light curry with rice.

The flying bird of the day is a siskin.

flying siskin

A literal footnote:  Sandy has sent me a message to say that his operation has gone well.  Thank you for the kind wishes that you expressed.

Published by tootlepedal

Cyclist, retired teacher, curmudgeon, keen amateur photographer.

28 thoughts on “Norwegian weather

  1. A beautiful sunny day for taking advantage of both a ride and a walk. We had a cold and colorful dawn here, which quickly turned grey and overcast within the hour.

    Sending Sandy best wishes for a speedy recovery now. Glad to hear all went well.

  2. Toe clips . . . a recipe for disaster for people like me – glad you avoided them until you determined you were not dizzy.

    1. I have old fashioned cages rather than modern clip ins and they are easier to get out of in an emergency but all the same, I was better off without any obstruction.

  3. Yay to Norway for coming through loud and clear. Hopefully the BBC make it tomorrow. It reminds me of when we were walking on the cliffs at Dover and our cellphones were cheerfully (and expensively) flicking between France and UK. If only you could control it … maybe some kind of dance?!🤣

  4. I’m glad to hear that Sandy’s operation went well. I hope he recovers quickly.
    Beautiful weather and beautiful flowers. Maybe that’s why all the birds were chirping.
    It sounds like you have a good handle on the dizziness, so that’s a good thing. It took much longer to curb my own.

    1. The sit down was both the literal and metaphorical high point of the day. The walk was good but to be able to sit and enjoy the sun for a quiet moment was even better.

  5. Lots to comment on. First, glad that Sandy’s operation went well. Second, yay for no dizziness. Onward ho for bike riding. Third, it sure looks like spring where you live. Fourth, gorse smells like coconut? I had no idea. The things I learn from my blogging friends.

  6. So glad you are conquering the dizziness… what a gorgeous day in your photographs. I am always hard-pressed to find one favorite but the colors of the child’s drawn hills from a coloring book caught my eye particularly.

  7. It’s amazing what a ray of sunshine does for one- everyone feels better when it’s sunny , at least we have until Sunday to enjoy this weather- British or Norwegian! Good to read that your cycle ride and walk went well- lots of lovely photos: I like the monument pointing to the moon, the hills ( it’s how I draw them!) and the crocus. Glad that Sandy’s operation went well.

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