Archive for the ‘Langholm’ Category

I have run out of new guest pictures so I am returning to my Somerset correspondent Ventetia’s trip to America.  She was driven along some beautiful  but slightly scary roads.


While we didn’t go quite as far as the guest picture, we were visited by some very unwelcome snow here and the temperature only just crept above zero all day.

flying chaffinch

The snow was mostly very light but as it was accompanied by a brisk and bitter wind, we viewed it largely through our windows.

I did go out to take two views of our completed bridge.



Severe critics have complained that  the gap below the railings on both the right and left sides are big enough to let a small child through but these are people who have no bridge of their own and are jealous of ours.  A child needs a little adventure in its life.

Marching bands, acrobats, peers of the realm and assorted reality TV celebrities are being lined up for the official opening.

While I was out, I admired the winter aconites which are looking promising…

winter aconites

..but even winter aconites need a bit of help from the elements to come into full flower.

The birds were grateful for some food on a chilly day…

flying chaffinch

…and chaffinches in particular turned up in large numbers.

flying chaffinch

But the odd greenfinch….

green finch

…and goldfinch was to be seen too.

flying goldfinch

Over lunchtime, I watched Scotland making very hard work of beating a good Italian side  in their final match of the Six nations rugby tournament and then, as the sun had come out, I went for a walk to recover from the excitement of a tense finish to the game.

It looked like a wonderful day…

Esk view of George Street

…but in the brisk wind the “feels like” factor was well below freezing.  I was hoping to see some waterside birds but they obviously didn’t care much for the cold either and I had to settle for some gently paddling mallards…


…and a herring gull on a rock in the river.

herring gull in river

Among dozens of black headed gulls, we seem to have only two resident herring gulls.  They like standing in the middle of the rivers.

You can see why I often like to walk along the Kilngreen….

Sawmill Brig

… and over the Sawmill Brig and up the Lodge Walks…

Lodge walks

…but even in when the sun was out, it was a bit of a penance today.  I only met one other walker and that was our friend Gavin.  He was also recovering from the stress of watching Scotland play.

Some cheerful moss on a tree stump…

moss on tree stump

…and a large and aged bracket fungus on a dead branch…


…gave me some thing to look at as I went round.

And I took a good look at a large tree on the other side of the playing field…

licheny tree

…which at first sight might look as though it had started to have some early spring foliage on it.

A closer look showed that any vibrancy in the colouring didn’t come from the tree but from its guests.

licheny tree

It is covered from head…


to toe in lichen and moss and has so much vegetation on it that it should be declared a national park in its own right.

An onrushing blizzard of light snow hurried me home but it stopped as I got to the house and the sun came out again.

This pattern continued for the rest of day with enough snow to start lying as the evening got colder.

It is due to keep snowing on and off through the night and tomorrow is going to be close to zero again (it is -2C as I write this) but with luck, there will be no travel problems when we want to go to our choir in the afternoon.

It doesn’t feel very much like four days before the vernal equinox though.

The flying bird of the day is one of the black headed gulls from the Kilngreen.

black headed gull


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In contrast to yesterday’s Antiguan sun, today’s guest picture shows a typical day in Derby.  My brother Andrew was suffering in the rain there a couple of day ago.


We had another very welcome dry day here today and things are even beginning to hint at drying out a little.  A bit more warmth would help the process.

A brisk wind also helps and we got that today, the downside being that it was a pretty chilly breeze and it made the day which was theoretically warm at 10°C feel a good deal colder.  Still, it was a useful day for a pedal and some gardening so we were happy.

My fairly speedy bike was still in the bike shop so I went out on the slow bike and stuck to skulking 18 miles twice up and down the Wauchope valley, as far out of the wind as I could stay.

I was impressed by the dedication of a flock of sheep to getting their strength up and stopped for a shot…


…and as I always look closely at a wall when I am leaning over one to take a photo, I took some lichen pictures while I was at it.

lichen on wall

I like the variations in colour, shape and style that the lichen on our roadside walls provides.

Otherwise, I kept my head well down in the crosswinds on the ride and didn’t take any more pictures.

When I got home, Mrs Tootlepedal had completed some errands round the town and was busy gardening.

She is very pleased with the early crocuses this year and so am I.

There are some brighter ones about…


…but the bulk of the flowers are a delicate pale violet and I like them both for themselves and when they mingle with the snowdrops.


And because I like eating it, I was very happy to see that the rhubarb is looking very promising.


Then I went inside and looked out.  The kitchen makes a warm and comfortable bird hide and supplies good coffee too (Rwandan today).

I looked high…


…and low.


After lunch, I went off for a walk.  It had been gently sunny while I had pedalled along in the morning but the clouds had come over for my walk and it was a grey afternoon.

Pathhead track

Snowdrops provided some cheer both at the start and near the finish of my walk.


On grey days, I tend to keep my eyes on the foreground and ignore the views and there is always something to help to pass the time.

This wall provided a home for some luxuriant moss.

mossy wall

And a birch tree had a neat circle of script lichen.

script lichen

As always, walls are a never ending source of delight and today I came across a growth which I hadn’t seen before.  It is the coral like structure on the left in the panel below.  I think that it must be lichen but I am by no means confident about that.

lichen on wall

On the other hand, I am confident about this.


This is definitely cladonia lichen.

I had already stopped at a promising piece of wall before I had noticed the tiny spots of red so either my lichen radar is improving with practice or I was just lucky because I didn’t see any more along the the wall.


It really is very red indeed.

I started and finished my walk with a visit to the Kilngreen in the hope of seeing some oyster catchers.

There was a pair at the Meeting of the Waters when I was on my out but they flew off with a gull before I could get too close…

oyster catchers

And there was a pair (probably the same pair I would imagine) in the same place when I came back an hour later and they flew off again, first to further up the bank of the river…

oyster catcher

…and then again to join the gulls on the fence posts.

Luckily one of them flew right past me.

oyster catcher

When I saw that I wasn’t going to get close to them, I took a shot through an arch of the Langholm Bridge which gave me a lot of pleasure even on a grey day.

Langholm Bridge

Mrs Tootlepedal was busy in the garden again when I got back and I fell easily into a supervisory role.  It is a suitable role for me as it doesn’t involve doing anything else but walking around and saying, “That looks good.”

In the evening, I went to sing with our local choir and enjoyed myself not least because I am sitting next to my cello playing friend Mike who is an excellent singer and keeps me right.

He remarked that he and his wife have been enjoying the frog pictures on the blog so here is one from today, especially for them.


The flying bird of the day is a black headed gull which  flew by while I was tracking the oyster catchers.  It has almost got its spring black head.

black headed gull


Oh and the title of the blog refers to a telephone call which I received from the bike shop this evening to tell me that the fairly speedy bike has got a two inch crack in the frame so it is time to say farewell to an old friend. Mrs Tootlepedal pointed out that it is just as well to discover a crack like that when it is in the bike shop and not when you are going down hill at 30mph.

I don’t remember exactly when I bought the fairly speedy bike, a Giant SCR, but I must have had it for over ten years so it will have done about 40,000 miles at least.  It has been a good servant, comfortable and reliable and I will be very happy if my new bike turns out to be as good.

I am going to look at getting a replacement suitable for a elderly gentleman with no great bike handling skills but who enjoys getting a few miles in over a year. Like Two Ton Tessie O’Shea used to say about herself, it will be built for comfort more than for speed.  I know my limits now.


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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Mary who spotted some fearless workers inspecting Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square.

Brave workmen inspecting Nelson's column

We were promised warmer, wetter weather and we got it.  It rained on and off all day and it was never lighter than ‘very gloomy’ inside and outside.

As a result, I was very happy to idle a morning away reading papers, drinking coffee and making soup.

I looked out of the window from time to time.

We had a good selection of visitors, many of whom looked a bit grumpy with the weather…

greenfinch and goldfinch

…including a sparrow among the usual suspects.  For some reason, the sparrows, of whom there are many in the town, visit a bush in the corner of our garden but don’t come to the feeder so this was a novelty.

sparrow and siskin

A robin and a blackbird made a brief appearance each.

robin and blackbird

…and the chaffinches arrived in an orderly fashion.


Out in the pond there was new frog spawn and a few frogs.

frog and spawn

Mrs Tootlepedal went off and did a little shopping and then went out again after lunch, this time to a meeting of her embroiderers’ group.

I thought about a short pedal when the rain stopped but the weather remained untrustworthy so I went for a walk instead.

As I walked along the edge of the park, I spotted all sorts of lichen and mosses…

moss and lichen

I am always pleased to see a red topped Cladonia as they are very small and I need a bit of luck to notice them.

This was my favourite among the mosses.


Of course, you have to be a real moss and lichen detective to see any moss round here!

mossy wall

I left the park wall behind and walked up into the Kernigal wood.  It was gloomy there too but as it was warmish and it wasn’t raining, I was quite happy strolling along the track.


It is often worth giving a tree stump a second look.

lichen and fungus

At one point, I could see a bright red light in the distance.  Although it doesn’t look like it in the picture, the light is on top of a communications mast on a hill and can be seen from miles around. It seems to be on night and day and has caused a lot of interest in the town.   Some think that it might be sending out secret mind control waves while others more prosaically link it to the arrival of 4G phone reception on the area.

mast light

When I came out of the wood, I followed the track down to Skipeprscleuch….

Road to skippers

…where the felling of the wood beside the track has opened up views of Warbla.


With the felling at the Becks Burn in mind, readers have asked if these felled woods are replanted and the answer is that they are.  The timber is a cash crop and I could see both new spruce trees and some hardwoods in plastic tubes too which are planted to encourage wildlife.

new planting

This was my favourite tree of the walk.

bare tree

I walked past a cottage and noted the old plough in the garden…

old plough

…and a few yards further on, I came across another well appointed wall.

moss and lichen

When I got down to the main road just before Skippers Bridge, I noticed that the passing  traffic had made sure that there was no moss on the road side of the parapet of the bridge over the sike  but a look  over the other side of the parapet showed that there was no shortage of moss there.

A7 bridge

We don’t have many brick buildings in Langholm and I enjoyed the gentle colours of the building at the bridge.

garage door

I crossed the bridge and noted the wooden steps that are part of the walks network…

steps at skippers

…and I took another photograph of Skippers Bridge itself but as it was no different from the many I have taken before, I leave it to the readers’ imagination to picture it.

At this point, it started to rain, first gently and then heavily so I kept the camera in my pocket and scuttled home.

Mrs Tootlepedal had enjoyed a delightful demonstration of steampunk embroidery given by two ladies from Dumfries and I had enjoyed my walk so in spite of the gloomy weather, we had a good afternoon.

My enjoyment was increased by the fact that my walk had (deliberately) stopped me watching Scotland play Ireland at rugby.  I had had bad feelings about the likely result and had saved myself much mental agony by not watching the inevitable unfold.  Scotland struggle to win a match away from home but they are not unique in this.  Only two matches out of the eleven so far this year in the Six nations tournament have been won by the away team.

To cheer up a gloomy day, we had fish and chips from the chip shop for our tea and as I arrived at the counter at exactly the right moment to get freshly cooked fish straight out of the fryer, our meal was delicious.

The flying bird of the day is a chaffinch.

flying chaffinch






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Today’s guest picture comes from our daughter Annie’s recent working trip to Berlin where she spotted a familiar landmark.


Aided by temperatures just above freezing and some overnight rain, the snow continues its retreat from the garden.

lawn with snow melting

I had to go to the dentist after breakfast but it was only for a check up and I was passed fit for duty and no work was required.

I had look round the garden when I got back. There are signs that given a bit of sunshine, the crocuses may have survived the snow…


…and there was a clump of what looked like fresh frog spawn in the pond.

frog spawn

It was a drizzly sort of morning but it was enlivened by a large flock of siskins which invaded the garden.

They sat on top of the walnut tree and made a fearful racket with their chattering…


…they flew down and filled the plum tree…


…and they crowded together to pick up fallen seeds below the feeder.


There are always plenty of fallen seeds when siskins are about as they are messy eaters.  It is not necessarily their fault as they are tiny birds and the sunflower hearts are quite big.

busy feeders

There were a few chaffinches and goldfinches about too but the vast majority of the visitors today were siskins.  I counted over fifty of them at one time.

They did some steady eating in the rain…


…and a lot of quarrelling…


…and were not afraid to put the boot into a much larger goldfinch if one stood in the way.

siskin attacking goldfinch

Sometimes the goldfinches fought back…

goldfinch attacking siskin

…but there were also moments of ecumenical avianism.

busy feeder

Mrs Tootlepedal was helping at the Buccleuch Centre coffee shop over lunch so I hoped for the best weather wise and went to see if the Wauchope road was snow free on my fairly speedy bike.

The road was clear but the weather wasn’t…

Callister road

…and after five miles up to Callister in the rain, I got fed up and went home and had lunch.

Mrs Tootlepedal returned from the Buccleuch Centre and when we took a turn round the garden, it was plain that the rain had stopped so rather to my own surprise, I got my bike back out and went off and did another ten miles up to Callister and back in grey but dry conditions.

Loyal readers may remember that the rear view mirror fell off my slow bike on a ride a few days ago before the snow came and I was unable to spot it in the grass beside the road on my way home.

I was hopeful that the snow might have flattened the grass enough to make the mirror visible as I went up today and my hope was justified.  I saw the mirror lying on the verge.

I was pleased with that fact that I had spotted it but less pleased to find that a car had run over it and it was broken beyond repair.  I have ordered a new one.  Thanks to general decrepitude, I can’t bend my head round to look behind me without falling off my bike and a mirror is thus a necessity.

The bridge builder had been busy all morning on the the dam bridge repairs and by the afternoon, the bridge was open to traffic.

dam bridge repairs opening

We are still waiting for some new railings but that is merely cosmetic so it seemed only right to have a grand opening ceremony.

I hadn’t heard anything from the Queen in London and the Scottish First Minister is busy arguing about Brexit so we had to make do ourselves…

….and you can see what an impressive occasion it was.

The two nymphs of Wauchope Street, Mrs Tootlepedal and Mrs Ewart held the ceremonial ivy while the Queen of Wauchope Street, Mrs Margaret Hogg did the honours with the kitchen scissors.  Riley, the terrier, kept a watchful eye on proceedings to see that protocol was fully observed.


The ivy was cut and Liz presented Margaret with a grand bouquet of flowers…

dam bridge repairs opening

…before the procession moved off over the bridge…

dam bridge repairs opening

…in pursuit of a nice cup of tea and a biscuit in Wauchope Cottage.

We may have to do it all again when the new railings come.

After this excitement, Mrs Tootlepedal went off to do some more helping out at the Buccleuch Centre and the rest of us had a much needed rest.

It looks as though we are going to avoid any more serious snow for the next few days but with light rain almost every day and temperatures no higher than 7°C until the middle of the month, we are not stocking up on sun tan lotion just yet.

The flying bird of a rather gloomy day is one of the many siskins.







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Today’s guest picture comes from Dropscone’s Irish adventure and shows one of the more exciting roads that the party drove over on their outings.


We were in a state of deja vu today as the scene outside the window when we woke up was still snowy, the temperature was still around freezing and the skies were still grey.

Thanks to the snow, the producers’ market at the Buccleuch Centre was cancelled so I was very disappointed as it is the highlight of my shopping  month and we are now in the midst of a quality cheese drought in Tootlepedal Mansions.

However, as the morning wore on, the temperature rose by a degree and since the main roads seemed to be clear and dry, we thought it a good idea to make sure that the car was still going and made a little motor excursion through the town to a shop instead of the market.

I had cleared the snow off the car a couple of days ago and also cleared the snow off the road around it and in spite of frequent light snow showers since then, the car and the road were still clean enough to let us set off with no more sweeping or shovelling required.

Perhaps because of the very dry nature of the snow, no doors were frozen up, the wipers were free to wipe and the car started at the first request.   We were relieved as we hope to go to Carlisle for a choir practice tomorrow.

We didn’t have many birds in the morning but we did have one mass visit from starlings who perched on the top of the walnut tree.  Some were in vertical mode…


…and others preferred the horizontal way.


Yesterday’s posing chaffinch had another go at being FBotD but mistimed her effort.

flying chaffinch

You can’t win them all.

A crow on a neighbour’s roof gave me the excuse to squeeze a little moss into the post.


After lunch, as it was dry and I could see the tops of the hills, I went for a walk in the hope of some snowy scenery.

I caught up with a friend who was going to the golf club (not to play golf) and walked up the Kirk Wynd with him.  When he went into the golf clubhouse, I kept going.

I had a quick look behind me as I got above the town….

snowy scene

…but this was as much of a scenic view as I got as soon the clouds came down on the hills and it started to snow again.

It was only light snow though so I pushed on past the golf course and onto the the hill.

The gorse was trying its best under testing circumstances…

gorse in snow

…and although the snow was quite deep in places and tiring to plough through, I wasn’t tempted to rest for a while on the bench at Whita Well.

snowy bench

I did for a moment consider trying to go straight up the hill to the summit but good sense prevailed and I turned left and went along the contours of the hill to the Newcastleton road.

The brisk winds of yesterday had had two contradictory effects.  In places they had swept the hillside fairly clean and the walking was easy and elsewhere, they had piled the snow up into drifts.  It wasn’t always easy to tell whether a plain white patch in front of me was thin or thick though and I had one or two uncomfortable moments stepping into what proved to be quite deep bits.

Fortunately, just as I was thinking that a strategic retreat might be wise, I came upon the wheel tracks of a hill vehicle which had been out looking after the sheep and although the tracks were well covered in snow, they gave me a guide which kept me out of any drifts.

Whita with snow

The sharp eyed will be able to see the rather ghostly tracks at the bottom left of the picture above.

They led me safely to the Newcastleton road….

Copshaw Road

…and I was glad that I was walking and not driving down it.

I had plenty of help with my directions…

Bird print

…which was needed as it was sometimes hard to tell where the road ended and the verges began.

Copshaw Road

The sheep are clever animals and had found a good windswept patch where some grass had been exposed and were munching away with their backs firmly to the wind (and the photographer).

sheep in snow

Once I got down to the main road, I found that yet again the snowplough had thrown the excess snow onto the footpath so I had to walk along the road itself to make progress.  Luckily there was hardly any traffic but what there was was paying no attention to the signs and I had to skip briskly onto the pavement once or twice..

Welcome to Langholm

I got to the Sawmill Brig but didn’t cross it when I came to it on this occasion and I was pleased with this decision…

sawmill brig

…when I found a bird like icicle on a bench on the Kilngreen…

icicle kilngreen

…and then  met Mr Grumpy on the banks of the river.

heron in snow

He flew off but when I tried to follow him with the camera and all I got was a picture of the light but persistent snow.


I caught an oyster catcher instead as I walked along the Esk.

oyster catcher

The snow and ice had made this short walk quite energetic so I was more than happy to test drive some scones that Mrs Tootlepedal had made while I was out and then sink into a comfortable chair and watch cycling and athletics for the rest of the afternoon (and quite a lot of the evening).

The temperature is due to rise a bit over the next few days so with luck we may get a steady thaw without any floods to go with it.

The flying bird of the day, to ensure correct blog gender balance after yesterday’s flying female, is a male chaffinch.

flying chaffinch

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Today’s guest picture shows a very cool customer who turned up in my son Tony’s back garden yesterday.

Tony's snowman

Tony was busy again today.

tony's igloo

I notice that he got out of the igloo before he let anyone stand on it.

The snow was still here this morning in Langholm too.  The wind had sighed and moaned round the house all through the night but it hadn’t blown the snow away and we didn’t have much in the way of drifts which was a relief.

After a quiet morning, having coffee with our neighbour Liz and laying in a fresh supply of milk and potatoes, I went out to see if I could turn our snow laden hedges into castle walls….

hedge with snow

It wasn’t very successful.  To make it work at all, I would have to leave a layer of snow on top of the hedge under each cut and that seemed like more hard work than it was worth.

The birds were rather quiet today again with only a single goldfinch showing up all day…


…with no siskins or greenfinches at all.

This left the feeder to the chaffinches…

flying chaffinches

…and the ground below to robin and dunnock.

robin and dunnock

The chaffinches didn’t appreciate being left alone and showed a regrettable tendency to kick each other.  I liked the rather grand operatic feel of this little battle.

fighting chaffinches

After lunch, I had to go to a volunteers’ meeting at the Welcome to Langholm office and took a small diversion on my way home.

It was cold.


In John Street, the natives were clearing ice off the road.

Big Dave

Where the cars had compacted the snow, it was so hard that Big Dave was using a pick axe to loosen it before shovelling it away.

For once it didn’t start snowing as soon as I went for a walk….

Langholm Bridge

….but the wind made it the coldest day of the present spell by far.

ice in Ewes

Because I didn’t have my big camera and lens with me, the sky was full of gulls circling above my head.


On the wall by the Sawmill Brig, a small outcrop of moss had broken through the snow…

moss in snow

..whether it had got some heat about it or whether it was just the added moisture that it retained, I couldn’t say.  Nearby, a bigger patch had thrown off the snow and was looking very happy.


It was too cold to hang around snapping so I looked at the castle ruins…

Langholm Castle

…and kept walking.

The most outstanding feature of the walk was the number of icicles above my head as I walked through the town.


Two views of Henry Street.


Oddly, only one side of the street had icicles.

There were one or two that I made sure I didn’t step under.


On a wall near our house, I saw this sheet of ice….


…and having seen a sheet of ice on Venetia’s blog describing a visit to Bedford NH, I took a closer look with my camera set to video record.  She had seen tadpoles under her ice and sure enough, there were tadpoles under this one too.

I was grateful to Venetia because if it hadn’t been for her blog, I would never have given this sheet a second look.  I thought that the tadpoles were fascinating.

It was rather a gloomy day with no break in the clouds and a chilly wind so I was glad to get back home and I didn’t go out again.

At least the cold weather means that I am getting some hymn singing practice in.

The flying bird of the day is a female chaffinch.  It is not the sharpest picture that I have ever taken but it is one of the most elegant.

flying chaffinch



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Today’s guest picture is another from Dropscone’s Irish holiday.  As well as an interesting wall, he found an interesting house.

irish house

After more snow overnight, the first task of the day was to clear the path along our drive and go to the shops for some milk.  The path was cleared but the milk hadn’t got through to the shop so we just have to hope that there will be some there tomorrow.

The path clearing had the unhappy effect of bringing on the snow again and it then snowed on and off for the rest of the day, leaving us with nine inches by the evening.

As there was a brisk wind blowing and the snow is light and fluffy, it was sometimes hard to tell whether we were seeing snow falling or just blowing past the window.  Either way, it wasn’t a good day for watching the birds as the kitchen window was often covered with snowflakes.

Dropscone and Sandy braved the snow to come for coffee and as Dropscone brought some of his excellent treacle scones with him, we were all greatly cheered up.

After coffee, I cleared the path again and spotted a robin on the feeder…


…before making some soup for lunch.

There was a promise of occasional sunny spells in the afternoon so I was mentally prepared for a walk after lunch and when things lightened up, I put on my coat and shot out.

I sneaked across the unfinished dam bridge and saw that the dam itself was pretty well snowed up.

dam filled with snow

I had to run the gauntlet of some dangerous looking icicles on a gutter in Caroline Street…

icicles in caroline Street

…but after I passed, a resident was doing his best to knock them off with some well aimed snowballs.

There has not been a lot of driving about lately and you can see why.

snow covered car

Although the main roads are reasonably clear, the advice is not to drive unless it is absolutely necessary.  Because we get so little snow, it is hard to be prepared for it when it comes and also unreasonably expensive to get all the gear suitable for snow and ice which you might then use for perhaps only three days over two years.

Fifty years ago, lots of people, including us,  had chains for their car tyres because it snowed a lot more and cars were trickier to drive but I doubt if anyone still has them now.  Many of the problems on our roads come from the fact that so many businesses operate on a ‘just in time’ basis and in effect have mobile storage depots on motorways.  It only takes one sliding articulated lorry to block a road. Mind you, optimistic and inexperienced car drivers don’t help either.

It was reasonably clear when I started my walk….

Langholm bridge

…but by the time that I had crossed the bridge, far from the sun coming out, it had started to snow again.

Langholm bridge

I plodded on, making heavy weather of the deep snow but not tempted to to take a rest on this bench.

kilngreen bench

When I needed a breather, there was always something to look at.

kilngreen trees

It was a lot easier when I had some car tracks to walk in along the Lodge walks.

Lodge walks in snow


When the snow stopped and the tops of the hills came into view, I was interested to see that the wind was so strong  that it looked as though the higher up the hill you went, the less snow there was.  I could see a hint of green on the summit of Timpen.

Timpen in snow

The trees were very neatly outlined.

snowy bare tree

The gas canisters were the only spot of colour on my walk but there were many good patterns.

snow shots

There is a lot of ice on the edges of the river but it doesn’t look as though it will be anywhere near cold enough for the whole river to ice up.

esk with ice

I certainly hope so.

I crossed the Duchess Bridge which looked quite handsome in the snow…

duchess bridge

…and this was more than could be said of the view from the middle of the bridge as it had started snowing heavily again as soon as I stepped onto it.

view from duchess bridge

As it was mostly buried under the snow, there had not been much in the way of lichens or moss to look at on my walk but the wall at the Scholars’ Field had small piece of iced moss on display.


Once again, I was interested to see how different the moss looks from a distance and in close up.

When I got home, I cleared the snow from on top of and around our car which is parked up the road a bit during the bridge repair works.  As a kind passer by noted, this may have been a bit of a Sisyphean task and it started snowing again not long after I had finished.  I also cleared the path along our drive and that was soon covered up again.

snowy path

With a forecast of more snow showers tomorrow, a continual 25 mile per hour wind and the temperature at or about freezing all day,  I may have a busy drive clearing day in front of me.  Still, it keeps me occupied which must be a good thing.  And on the plus side, the snow is the easiest shovelling snow that I can ever remember meeting.

As the alert reader will have realised, we didn’t go to Edinburgh to see Matilda today, even though it was a Thursday.   Honestly, as superior newspaper columnists tend to ask on these occasions, what is wrong with us?  Two flakes of snow and the whole country shuts down.  Get a grip Britain!  But we are old and cautious these days.

The individual flying bird was not easily found in the whirling snow and poor light and strong winds make them unwilling to hover if they can avoid it so an ensemble piece will have to do.

busy feeder



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