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Posts Tagged ‘chive’

I was looking through my files when I found today’s guest picture.  It shows a Liverpool gull hoping to get Bruce to open his hotel window and give it a snack.  It was taken before Bruce went off to Helsinki.  He gets about a lot.

Liverpool gull

It was sunny and windy here today but as there was no rain all day, we liked the sun and ignored the wind as far as we could.

I had a generally relaxed day with coffee and conversation in the morning, a battle between bicycle and breeze in the afternoon and some top quality blues music in the evening.

The coffee and conversation was in the company of Dropscone who had brought some treacle scones with him in a traditional fashion.  He had been playing golf yesterday but as he missed a one foot putt rather carelessly at one point, he was not as happy about that as he might have been.

When he left, I had a walk round the garden and was pleased to see a bee visiting.

october bee

The butterflies have gone but there are still occasional bees.

I picked up quite a lot of walnuts.  They are not hard to spot.

walnut on ground

Then I sieved a little compost and while I was in the vegetable garden I dug up a good sized leek and took a picture of a chive…

chive flower

…and I looked up to see a starling on the holly tree,  I like the way that starlings look as though they are covered in hearts.

hearty starling

I went to inspect the middle lawn and noted the number of fuchsia flowers still waiting to come out in the bed beside the lawn.  We have got another week before a frosty morning is forecast so they still have time.

potential fuchsia

The middle lawn looked as though it might need a cut as the grass has started to grow again after I thought that it had decided to stop for the year.  A sparrow caught my eye as I went to get the mower out…

sparrow behind twig

…and there turned out to be enough grass to make it worthwhile to mow the lawn.  I sat on the new bench and admired the result.

mown lawn october

As I sat there, a bee visited a nicotiana beside me but it got stuck in so thoroughly that there was no trace of it when I looked.  It came out too quickly for me to catch but then flew down on to the ground in front of me and posed for a picture.

nicotiana and bee

There is a small but colourful corner next to the bench.

colourful corner lawn

I went in and used the leek to make some soup for lunch.  Mrs Tootlepedal had made some wholemeal bread yesterday and it went very well with the soup and some cheese.

After lunch, I went out for a cycle ride.  I had ambitions for a ride of thirty or thirty five miles in the sunshine but after spending half an hour battling into a wind gusting up to thirty miles an hour, I turned left and headed down to Canonbie for a twenty mile circuit with the wind mostly across or behind.

This was a good choice as it took me 31 minutes to do the first five miles and 64 minutes to do the next fifteen.

I was too busy pedalling to take pictures until I got the wind behind me at Canonbie.

Canonbie road

Apart from the breeze, it was a lovely day for a pedal and the trees along the Esk at Byreburnfoot looked very seasonal.

Esk below hollows

There is a little patch of grass where I stood to take the picture above and for some reason, it is a great place for fungus every year.

fungus at byreburnside

I often wonder what is buried beneath it.

My Canonbie route takes me along two sections of the old main road.  This section at Hollows was by-passed when half of the road fell into the river nearly forty years ago.

old a7 hollows

And this section at Auchenrivock was bypassed more recently when another section of the road slid into the river.  I took a poor picture of it but have put it in anyway to show local readers that they are cutting trees down here and the tarmac is seeing the light of day for the first time for ages.

old a7 irvine house

The tree felling is near Irvine House.

irvine house october

I stopped at Skippers Bridge and thought that the steps that the Langholm Walks Group put up for Walk 7 looked very inviting..

steps at skippers

…but I didn’t walk any further than down to the waterside to look through the bridge at the old distillery.skippers and distillery

When I got home, I found Mrs Tootlepedal grappling with a very intractable website which required several codes to be entered to gain access to it.  Unfortunately, however many she put in, none seemed to be able to unlock the door so she gave up in despair and made me a cup of tea (and a slice of wholemeal toast) instead.

I went out for look round the garden and decided that the front lawn might need a mow too, so I mowed it.  It turned out that it didn’t really need a mow as it get less of the sun as it gets lower in the sky than the middle lawn and I didn’t get much grass off it at all.

I took a picture of one of our most long lived flowering plants, the ornamental strawberry which has been in flower since the beginning of June…

tame strawberry

…and then went in to have a shower.

After a meal of ham and eggs, I left Mrs Tootlepedal to watch Gardeners’ World and walked down to the Buccleuch Centre to attend a concert of mostly blues music sung and played by Maggie Bell and Dave Kelly, veterans of the British music scene.

It was a most enjoyable evening and I especially admired Dave Kelly’s guitar playing.  (You can hear a sample of his work here if you wish.   It sounded much better when he played it live tonight but it gives you an idea of his skills and style.)

The flying starling of the day is not showing off its wings for once.

flying starling

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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Mary.  She visited Wells with her friend, my Somerset corespondent Venetia, and took this reflective portrait of the cathedral from the bishop’s garden.

wells cathedral from Bishop's garden

We had a colder, windier day than yesterday, but as it was drier than forecast and the sun even came out briefly once or twice, we were grateful at a time when elsewhere in the country, torrential rain was making life hard.

I started the day by going to collect my bike from the bike shop where it had been serviced.  Because it has a gear box rather then a derailleur, it had had an oil change instead of a new cassette after just under four thousand miles.  The oil change was cheaper than a new cassette and chain but it still made my eyes water.  I will have to learn how to do it myself.

When I got home, I did a little shredding, put the results in compost bin A and then sieved more of compost bin C and put the bits that didn’t go through the sieve into compost bin D.  I lead a deep and exciting life.

Then I compounded the excitement by wandering about with a camera in hand.

The orange hawkweed is also known as ‘fox and cubs’ and this foxy flower looked as though it was brooding its cubs.

fox and cubs hawkweed

We have spireas that have showy leaves and dull flowers and we have spireas with dull leaves and showy flowers, very showy flowers.

spirea blossoms

Although we have had plenty of bees, I haven’t seen a great many smaller insects so I was pleased to see this one on a doronicum.

insect on doronicum

The tropaeolum flowers on the yew were lining up in attacking formation.

three tropaeolum attack

Apart from the rosa moyesii, which is in full flower, the other roses are still mainly work in progress. Like almost everything else in the garden, they could do with a bit of warmth.

four roses

The chives were still attracting various bees…

two bees on chives

…and I managed to get a wing as well as two bees knees in today’s shot.

close up on chive bee

By the front door, one clematis keeps fading while the other keeps flourishing.

clematis seed head and flower

It is hard to say which is prettier though.

By this time, lunch was calling and after lunch, I settled down for a while to watch the birds.

It was still very windy and this siskin was keeping firmly plunked down on the perch.

flat siskin

An anxious sparrow checked to see if there was a vacancy.

hopeful sparrow

I did think of going for a ‘bicycle walk’ just to get out of the house, but the weather was so unforgiving, cold and very windy, that I stayed in and caught up on some of the hymns for next Sunday’s service.

After a couple of hours, I went out to check the weather and noticed that Mrs Tootlepedal has a fine crop of doddering dillies growing in the bed at the end of the drive.  This grass has the Sunday name of Briza Media and it is also known as Common Quaking Grass and in the wind today, these doddering and quaking grasses were certainly living up to their name.  I had to pinch a head off one stem and take it inside to get it to stop quaking long enough for me to take a picture.

doddering dillies

The first candelabra primula flowers have appeared beside the pond.  I hope that they do well in spite of the weather, as they are among my favourite flowers…

early candelabra primula

…though of course, this is my absolute favourite.

astrantia

The day hadn’t got any better so I went back in and watched the birds again.

The squad of goldfinches was back….

four goldfinches

…though a siskin managed to sneak in at one point…

five goldfinches

…and occasionally there were more goldfinches than perches.

four goldfinches and a siskin

A greenfinch had no difficulty in persuading a goldfinch to offer it a seat at the table…

greenfinch close

…and when they had all gone off, a redpoll appeared and wasted my valuable seed.

redpoll spitting

My view of redpolls as charming little birds has been somewhat dented by seeing a redpoll nest live on the Springwatch programme on the telly.  It was the most disgustingly untidy nest that you could ever see.

Mrs Tootlepedal made a delicious one pot penne, tomato and cream cheese dish for our tea.  As the rain taps on our windows as I write this, we are just hoping that the weather will let us get to Edinburgh tomorrow.  A tree had fallen on the line today but it has been cleared, so all is well at the moment.

As a bonus for another ‘stay at home’ post, there is not one but two flying sparrows of the day.

flying sparrow looking

In the strong winds, birds had to approach the feeder with care.

flying sparrow hanging

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Today’s guest picture comes from our son Tony in East Wemyss.  He wanted to show me that they have butterflies there too but their ones come indoors.

wemyss butterfly

It was a stop start sort of day.

Our car had two warning lights when we got back from Carlisle yesterday and they were still sending out bad vibes when I switched on the engine this morning.  I rang the garage to see if they could do anything and there was a good deal of sucking of teeth and sighing.  “Very busy….not taking any more work this week…(sound of Tootlepedal crying) ….oh well, bring it in and we’ll see if we can look at it….no promises.”

I took it in.  They looked at it.  No more warning lights.  I collected it.  It was raining lightly by this time but I was very sunny.  Fingers are firmly crossed as I have to drive fifty miles tomorrow.

When I got home, the sun was shining so I went out into the garden for a walk round with Mrs Tootlepedal.  There had been ice on the car windscreen with a temperature of 2°C before breakfast and a lot of the dahlias had turned up their toes as a result.  However, it had warmed up quite quickly and there were survivors all around.

late garden flowers

Clockwise from top left: Gaura, calendula, rudbeckia and perennial wallflower

The upside of the demise of the Sunny Reggae dahlias was more space and light for the two fuchsias behind them.

fuchsia October

fat fuchsia october

And I did see a red admiral butterfly.  It was on the remains of the French marigolds which did such a good job of protecting the carrots earlier in the year.

red admiral on marigold

In the vegetable garden, chive and mint are still in flower.

chive and mint

Mrs Tootlepedal was mourning the loss of some nasturtiums to the cold when she noticed that there was some damage that wasn’t weather related.

cabbage white caterpillar (2)

Cabbage white caterpillars were chomping their way through leaves and flowers.

cabbage white caterpillar

Our kitchen was being painted and I had to wait in for the call from the garage so I put the morning to good use by entering two weeks of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database.  I am well behind schedule at this task so this was not before time.

When the painter went off to let the first coat of paint dry, I watched the birds from the kitchen window.  It was another busy day.

There was a mixture of greenfinches, sparrows and chaffinches at first…

busy feedr

…but a small gang of goldfinches soon turned up too.

goldfinches

Political discussions grew heated and a sparrow had to fly in to calm down two goldfinches who were debating the merits of Canada ++ and/or of falling of a cliff.

goldfinches in discussion

Greenfinches pursued sparrows…

greenfinch in pursuit

…and then goldfinches pursued sparrows.

goldfinch and sparrow

But the goldfinches couldn’t stop arguing.  The one on the left is practising the ‘no deal’ Brexit position.

goldfinch coming and going

A coal tit rose above the bickering…

coal tit on pole

…and a chaffinch showed her disgust at the whole situation.

fierce chaffinch

One of our visiting jackdaws has some elegant white wing feathers to show off.

jackdaw with white

Over lunch, we watched a re-run of the last kilometres of the men’s world championship cycling road race and felt for the riders as they had to battle up an extremely steep hill.

When the painter came back, we went out into the garden and did some useful work.  I mowed the drying green and the green house grass, did some shredding and sieved some compost.  The compost went on to the first of the new beds at the top of the vegetable garden which Mrs Tootlepedal had been preparing.

new bed back veg

I trimmed the top of the white clematis round the back door as it was creeping up in to the gutter and while I was in clematis mode, I noticed that we still have two clematis on the go in a modest way.

late clematis

I rounded off my photographic day with a glimpse of a dunnock…

dunnock

….the first to appear on the blog since early June.

Mike Tinker dropped in to report that his son David and family were safely on their journey back to New Zealand.  They will be looking forward to some warmer weather no doubt.

In the early evening, Luke came to play flute and once again we made steady progress (hemidemisemiquavers are meat and drink to us now) and then after tea, I went off to play trios with Mike and Isabel.  What with one thing and another, we haven’t been playing a lot recently and it was good to get together again even though some rustiness was apparent all round.  The Reader’s Digest used to suggest that laughter is the best medicine but I think it is music.

The flying bird of the day is a determined chaffinch.

flying chaffinch

 

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from our daughter Annie.  She is working in Zurich this week and took a picture of the sunset there this evening.

Zurich sunset

There was no chance of a sunset here today…or a sunrise…or a sun anything as the sun was conspicuous by its absence all day.  The forecast told me that if I was up sharp, I might be able to get up to the Moorland Feeders, where I was filling in for absent friends, before the rain started for the day.

I took them at their word and they were quite right so I filled the feeders and sat in the hide for a while  before the rain started.  It might not have been raining but it was very gloomy so only brightly coloured birds which came close were available to snap.  It was my lucky day.

Greater spotted woodpecker

A greater spotted woodpecker coming close

Greater spotted woodpecker

And a greater spotted woodpecker coming closer…

Greater spotted woodpecker

…and then going away again

When it flew off, I took the hint and went away too.  I was glad to have got a brief glimpse of a goldfinch, the first of the autumn while I was there.

goldfinch

It was still raining when I got home and it rained on and off in a half hearted way for the rest of the day.  It was that annoying sort of rain which kept looking as though it had stopped but by the time that I had got outside to check, it had started again.

Under the circumstances, Mrs Tootlepedal got on with repainting the doors in the hall and I put a week and a bit of the newspaper index into the Langholm Archive Group’s database.

You can learn a lot from the newspaper index.  In 1854 there were only 12 advertisements for food in the whole year but by 1874, there were 116.  There were 140 by 1894 but the biggest item advertised by far was tea, which was obviously a big seller by then.

I went out to our corner shop to buy food (but not tea) and noticed an unusually long array of collared doves on the wire by the dam as I left the house.

collared doves

I don’t know enough about collared doves to say whether this might be one happy family or just a gathering of friends.

At lunch time, I noticed that Mrs Tootlepedal had brought a couple of nasturtium flowers into the kitchen…

nasturtiums

Their cheerful colour brightened the day up a bit and made me look closer too.

nasturtiums

I did go out to check the rain.  It was light but persistent.  Flowers looked a bit depressed.

P1030684

mint and chives

There is some colour in the vegetable garden though

clematis

and a very low flying clematis

We picked some runner and French beans and ate them for our lunch.  Even if the rain had stopped, it would have been too soggy for gardening.

It was one of those days which felt colder than the thermometer said that it should be so after lunch, I lit a fire in the front room and settled down to put music into the computer for practice purposes.  With about sixteen new songs on hand for Christmas concerts with my two choirs, I have plenty to get on with.

I kept on thinking about going for a walk in the rain but settled for making rolls with the help of the bread making machine instead.  They turned out well.

rolls

When they had come out of the oven, I had another look out into the garden at four o’clock.

colourful corner

In spite of the efforts of the flowers to persuade me that it wasn’t too bad….

dahlia

…I wasn’t tempted to stay out as it was too gloomy for a photographic walk by now so I took a picture of a crow on the roof…

crow

…and came back in and made a sausage stew for my tea.

It too turned out well and I was in a good mood in spite of some heavier rain when I went off for a Langholm Sings choir practice.  The attendance was a bit thin, possibly because of a showing of La La Land at the Buccleuch Centre at the same time.  I was happy to miss the film, which we have already seen and judged pretty dull, and very much enjoyed the practice.  All the songs and carols that we are preparing have their charms.

I am going back to the Moorland Feeders tomorrow morning, this time as a substitute for Sandy, who is sunning himself elsewhere, and I hope for better weather.

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Susan, who has been kind enough to send me this massive but hungry looking  figure which is currently hanging around at the British Museum.

skeletonWe woke to another grey and wet morning but we weren’t downhearted because Dropscone was due to come round with treacle scones and the forecast was for an end to the rain well before lunch.

Both of these happy events came to pass.

I even got to see a short  video of Dropscone practising his golf swing under the eye of his golf professional.  What a great start to the day.

After coffee, I took a stroll round the garden.  It is getting very near the end of its flowery life but there are still bits and bobs about.

chives

The chives are still brightening up the vegetable plots.

chives

The orange crocosmia is very durable and I was surprised to see a honeysuckle blossom

crocosmia

The yellow crocosmia arrived late and is staying late

clematis and nerine

There are a few clematis flowers and a lot of nerines.

But the prettiest thing in the garden today was this Charles Ross apple….

Charles Ross…and some of them went down very well in the evening when stewed and taken with custard.  The cool summer and the relatively good autumn have left the apples tasting as good as they have ever done this year.

While Mrs Tootlepedal busied herself with some apple branch sawing, I made some potato soup for lunch.  She was frequently visited by a robin while she worked but my only glimpse of one when I had a camera in my hand, was this one out of the dining room window later on.

robinI saw several jackdaws when I put out some pellets…

jackdaw…but sadly the best one flew past a telegraph pole just as I snapped it so I couldn’t use it as flying bird of the day.  The chaffinches were in a kinder mood…

flying chaffinchflying chaffinch…though I did catch one making off with a pink pellet that should have been reserved for blue and coal tits.

chaffinchAs well as all the flying birds, there were some standing around too.

dunnock and blackbird

A dunnock and blackbird, frequently seen in the garden but not feeder users.

After lunch, while Mrs Tootlepedal did more tidying and bulb planting, I went off for a pedal.

Because I don’t like taking medicine if I don’t have to, I have been experimenting with cutting down on my asthma puffers over recent days but after feeling rather gloomy yesterday and very cold and tired while I was pedalling, I returned to the full dose today with very beneficial results.  I was much cheerier all day, I was much warmer when I went out for my bike ride and I went quite a bit more quickly too.  “Keep taking the tablets,” as they say.

I even had the energy to stop and take a picture or two of the larches along the Wauchope road which are probably at their autumn best.  A little sunshine would have helped but they looked good anyway in my view.

Pool CornerlarchesApart from the larches, it was a bit gloomy and wisps of cloud were still sitting on the tops of the hills.

CleuchfootWhen I got back, we had a visit from Mike Tinker who came to tell us that his wife Alison was a bit poorly and so wouldn’t be coming to play duets in the evening.  This was a disappointment as they have been on holiday and I was looking forward to a tootle on their return.

It did give me some time to practice some choir music so there was an upside.

The flying bird of the day is a blue tit who was legally carrying off a pellet from the new feeder.

flying blue tit

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Today’s guest picture is another of the Santander statuary spotted by my brother on his Spanish jaunt last month.  He remarks that the figures look a little put out by the building works.

Santander

It was a grey and windy day and I took the opportunity to give my legs a rest so while Mrs Tootlepedal went off for a solo breezy cycle ride, I went up to the Moorland feeders with Sandy as it was his day for refilling them.

No sooner had we got out of the car than a flash of white caught my eye.  It was a male hen harrier flying low over the moor opposite the feeders.

hen harrier

In spite of the dim light, the camera was just able to pick it out against the grass but it soon disappeared when it flew over the bog cotton.

bog cotton

The bog cotton was well worth a look in its own right, painting the hillsides with vivid splashes of white..

bog cotton

We didn’t stop when we had filled the feeders as the wind was cold and Sandy is recovering from pneumonia and probably shouldn’t have been out at all.  I couldn’t resist a pheasant shot before I left though.

pheasant

After a cup of coffee and a slice of sour dough bread, Sandy went off home to rest.  Mrs Tootlepedal had returned from her cycle ride while we were having coffee and she complained that her back tyre seemed flat.  When Sandy had gone, I checked the tyre and it was indeed flat as a pancake.

She rides on very durable tyres so I was surprised at this but I got the tyre off and inflated the inner tube to see where the puncture was.  There was no puncture.  The chances are that the deflation must have been caused by an insufficiently tightened valve top.  I was a bit annoyed with myself for not trying to inflate the tyre when it was still on the bike but Mrs Tootlepedal took advantage of the situation to give her back wheel and sprocket a really thorough clean.  I put the tube back in the tyre and have left it off the bike for the moment to see if it is still inflated tomorrow.

It wasn’t a great day for photographs of flowers because of the thick clouds and the wind but a Geum was near the back door so I shot that.

geum

They have lasted very well and there are still more to come as you can see.

Not every plant in the garden was planted by the gardener.  Nature sometimes has a shot herself.

aquilegia

I had to visit the doctor before lunch to formulate a plan of action regarding some joint niggles and this went very satisfactorily.

By the time that I had got home, a light rain had begun to fall which lasted on and off for the rest of the day.

The rain gave me some time time to get photographs ready for our annual exhibition which starts next week.  Considering how many pictures I dump into my blog posts every day, you might think that it would be easy for me to find ten to print out but the enormity of having to reject one thousand and ninety of the two thousand pictures I have posted since Christmas alone makes it very hard.  A lot of them are easily discarded as they are not sharp or big enough for a print but there is still a huge amount of choice.  Why this one and not that one?  It makes my head hurt and, in the end, I never feel that I have chosen the best ten.  Still it is done and that is a relief.

Mrs Tootlepedal was gardening away in the light rain so I went out to see what she was doing and took a few gloomy pictures while I was out there.

frog

A well camouflaged frog

iris

The dark blue irises have opened out.

daisies

Some daisies brightened up the dull day.

Hosta

A hosta was quietly impressive by the front lawn

geranium

A purple geranium has been added to our various geraniums in flower.

solomon's seal

So far the Solomon’s Seal and the gooseberries have avoided the sawfly. Long may this continue.

In the evening, we went to our local choir practice and were slightly handicapped by the fact that no basses at all turned up.  Still, we did some useful practice and even got two new pieces out.

One was a well known song (though not to me) called “Could it be Magic?” by Barry Manilow based on a prelude by F Chopin.  Some members of the choir greeted it as an old friend. I may grow to like it.

The other was “Cantique de Jean Racine”  by G Fauré.   This is very slow and in French.  Even if I do grow to like this one (which I may), we might have to search carefully about to find an audience that would like to hear us trying to sing it.

The non flying flower of the day was found in the vegetable garden.  It is a chive.

chive

 

 

 

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Today’s picture shows a wonderful contraption spotted by Bruce in Arran.

electric bike

I would like to thank everyone who took the trouble to comment on my wordless blog yesterday.  I can tell you that the original text which disappeared into the ether was a work of such sustained literary quality, brilliant insights and and wisdom just the usual stuff but it took me a long time to write  because I was tired and I was quite peeved when it vanished.  I sat down this morning to rewrite it but I couldn’t recapture that last thing at night feeling which usually animates me and gave up.  I will just say that Hermitage Castle is an impressive pile with a turbulent history-“the guardian of Scotland’s bloodiest valley’  – and well worth a visit if you are nearby.  Sandy gets the credit for spotting the tree creeper.

There must be quite a bit of pollen floating about at the moment because my asthma is annoying me.  It doesn’t do me any great harm but it does make me rather tired and I went round the morning run with Dropscone (who was on his smart new carbon fibre lightweight bike with proper clipless pedals) rather faster than was wise and spent the rest of the day moping around and grumping.  I can tell you that Dropscone’s bike has a down tube profile that  is bi-ovalised to mate perfectly with its oversized bottom bracket shell and deeper profiled chain stays.  I knew that you would be excited by this.

I am really feeling the lack of my zoom lens at present and the best I could do was to wander round the garden trying to take pictures of as many aquilegias as I could find.

There are quite a lot.

aquilegias

Two white

aquilegias

Four pinkish

aquilegias

And four bluish

There are more but I couldn’t get at them to take a decent shot.

The week of dry, calm weather has let the peonies really shine this year.

peonies

They are a bit fragile and in a normal year, no sooner do they come out than they are zapped by heavy rain and squally winds.

The astrantias are developing well. I like these flowers which are each a miniature garden in themselves.

astrantia

I was just snapping at the first daisies of the season….

daisies

…when Mrs Tootlepedal came up and complained that I wasn’t giving the vegetable garden enough respect so I went through and took this picture of some newly planted out runner beans (complete with the gardener’s feet).

runner beans

My view is that I will be happy to take veg garden pictures when I can eat the produce but i did my duty.   Mrs Tootlepedal has some comfrey growing in the veg garden.

comfrey

This is quite decorative and attracts bees but its chief use is as green manure.

Granny took us out for a meal at the Douglas last night and we were struck by the fact that the flowers in the vase on the table were chives.  This was unexpected but charming.  Our chives are looking well too.

chives

Having dome the veg garden justice, I went in and printed out two sets of leaflets for the Tourist Information points which I had been asked to provide.  There must have been some tourists about to make this task necessary.

After lunch, I put some straw down on the strawberries and considered netting them as they are developing well but in my lethargic state, I left that task to another day.

Mrs Tootlepedal is suffering from a sore knee so she sensibly took things easy as you can see.  Here she is relaxing.

zebra grass

She is remodelling the bed at the end of the drive.  Just the thing for a sore knee.

The tulips and the daffs are finally gone and this plant will soon go too, though even in this state, it still looks  very elegant.

over

The alliums are sprouting up all over the garden and they are beginning to look as though they might be going to take over the world.  I caught four of them putting their heads together and muttering about revolution in the back bed.

alliums

I felt a bit perkier later in the day and the arrival of my flute pupil Luke certainly helped as once again, he showed the results of solid practice.  He too is asthmatic and we are working hard to improve his breathing as well as his technique.

After a reviving meal of cottage pie, I ventured out to play some music with Isabel.  Our third player Mike was only just back from holiday and in no state to play so Isabel and I played four recorder sonatas, one by Telemann and three by Daniel Purcell,  the younger brother of the more famous Henry Purcell.  I bought these Purcell sonatas many years ago and I have only just started playing them.  They turn out to be charming and, just as importantly for me, not too difficult.

I had a go at  trying to catch a flying bird with my little lens and this was the result.  It looks like a young chaffinch.

chaffinch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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