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Posts Tagged ‘cycle outings’

Today’s guest picture shows another fine waterfall seen by Dropscone on his holiday in Skye.

Skye waterfall

We had the second bright but slightly chilly day in a row and once again, musical activity got in the way of cycling.

I did get out for a morning ride but only after I had put a lamb stew into the slow cooker and time limited by the need to be back in time to go to choir in the afternoon.   I nipped round my standard 20 miles down to Canonbie and back and, as it was London Marathon day, I was pleased that I had managed to go a little bit faster than the elite runners even if I didn’t go quite as far.

I didn’t take my camera but got it out as soon as I got home to celebrate the brilliance of the tulips which were enjoying the sunshine in the garden.

tulips

tulips

tulips

tulips

I think that they were at their best today and as we have a week of chilly weather with north winds to come, I may not see them as generously open again for some time.

tulips

tulips

My favourite tulip of the moment is the Ballerina…..

ballerina tulip

…and they looked so good today that Mrs Tootlepedal resolved to buy some more and plant them out for next year.  I am in favour of that.

The tulips rather overshadowed the other flowers but this little pulsatilla did its best to get into the act.

pulsatilla

I filled the feeders when I got back from my ride and after lunch, I took a moment to watch the birds before we went off to Carlisle.

We have a steady supply of redpolls at the moment.

redpolls

This one stared rather haughtily at me when I took its picture but soon went back to eating

redpolls

They had an active day

siskins

As did the siskins

The feeders are always busy at the moment and my supply of seed is disappearing in double quick time.

busy feeder

Representatives of our present customer base, chaffinch, goldfinch, siskin and redpoll

The choir rehearsal started badly, as our conductor and our accompanist were delayed on the train again.  The Sunday service from Glasgow is most unreliable.  However, they made up for lost time when they did arrive and we had an extremely brisk practice with a little extra time added on to the end.

We are working on a new modern song and it is one of those, as Mrs Tootlepedal remarked, where if you get to sing a note which is actually on the beat, it comes as a blessed relief.

Because of the extra time taken at the practice, we didn’t stop to take photographic advantage of the sunny evening as we went home but bustled on as quickly as we could and settled down to enjoy the lamb stew from the slow cooker when we got back.

While the potatoes were cooking, I watched some of my lawn care assistants at work on the middle lawn.

jackdaws

There should be no moss left at all soon, thanks to the jackdaws

I have still got a few miles to do on my bike if I am to keep up to my schedule for the month so I am hoping that there are a few kind days left in April.  This month is traditionally supposed to come in like a lion and go out like a lamb but having seen the forecast for next week, I don’t think that this will be a traditional month at all.  I am keeping my fingers crossed for a few calm moments.

The flying bird of the day is a traditional chaffinch in the best of the sun.

chaffinch

 

 

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from my brother Andrew, who was at the sea side in Morecambe yesterday.  He was lucky enough to find the sea at home.

MorecambeThe forecasters promised us a coolish day with light winds and no rain and they got it exactly right.  There was a light frost when we woke up which caused the tulips to hang their heads in distress but didn’t appear to actually finish any plants off completely.

The chill meant that I was in no hurry to get out on my bicycle and in the end, I waited until eleven o’clock before the temperature crept up to 7.5°C and then I went out.

The sun was out and it shone on the siskins…

siskin

One wisely leaving before being awarded the order of the boot from another

…who were in a rather factious mood…

siskins

More evasive action

…but for all its cheerful brightness, it wasn’t doing much to heat the day up.

For a change, I decided to leave the town following the road up the Esk  rather than my usual route up the Wauchope.  This does involve a couple of quite sharp but short climbs as soon as you leave the town and as I am not supposed to cycle up too many steep hills with my new tin knee, I use this route sparingly.

I took it very gently though and arrived at Eskdalemuir in good order.

Bridge over the Esk

The bridge over the Esk there is guarded by many power lines and poles

I could hardly hear myself think because of the insistent baa-ing of sheep and lambs in the field beside the river.

Eskdalemuir lambs

The thrifty people who built the church at Eskdalemuir in the early nineteenth century didn’t waste any money on frivolous ornamentation.

Eskdalemuir church

I was in expansive mood though and popped into the cafe at the Eskdalemuir Hub in the old school for a cup of coffee and a slice of lemon drizzle cake.  This gave me enough strength to head out over the hills to Lockerbie.  The route elevation….

garmin route 18 April 2017 elevation

…shows that the first part of my journey was quite hilly and annoyingly having climbed up a long hill to get to 900 feet before Eskdalemuir, it immediately drops sharply before leaving me with another climb of 400 feet or more to get back to 950 feet, the highest point of the trip.  These are not like Tour de France climbs but then I am not like a Tour de France climber and they were quite steep enough for me.

Once over the undulating plateau between Eskdalemuir and Boreland, there is some welcome down hill and the rest of the journey bobbed up and down over very gentle country.

Not all of our handsome stone bridges have survived modern traffic and this one over the Dryfe Water…

Dryfe Water bridge

…was so battered by a passing lorry that they gave up and put in a metal trough.

Once I was through Lockerbie, I was on the old main road south, now bypassed by a new motorway.  This is quite a dull road but it was brightened up a lot in places by a fringe of dandelions.

dandelions verge

It has a useful cycle lane on each side of the road.

I stopped to eat an egg roll near Eaglesfield and was reminded that this has been a busy place for many years.  In the foreground is a bridge over the Carlisle to Glasgow motorway and the flat topped hill in the background….

motorway and roman camp

…..was home not just to  a Roman camp but an Iron Age fort as well.

I didn’t stop for many pictures as the day had become quite dull and I needed to keep my mind on my cycling rather than looking for wild flowers in the verge.

In the end, I needed to go through the town for a mile and then back again to ring up exactly 60 miles on the computer as I swung into our drive.

I had enough energy left to walk round the garden and check that the frost hadn’t done too much damage.

hellebore, dicentra and dogwood

It hadn’t.

tulip, lamium and wallflower

One of the Euphorbias deserved a picture all to itself I thought.

euphorbia

There is no frost in the forecast for the next few days so perhaps we have escaped very lightly.

I filled up the feeders and in no time the siskins were back, taking every perch at both of  the feeders but behaving very sedately this time.

siskins

It was the goldfinches that had taken on the role of hooligans…

goldfinch kicking siskin

…though the siskins were not going quietly into the night.

goldfinch facing up to siskin

I was pleased to see a couple of redpolls keeping calm amongst the mayhem.

redpolls

I had time for a shower and then we welcomed my younger brother and oldest sister to the house.  They are spending a few days in the Lake District and came up to have a meal with us in the Douglas Hotel.  The meal and the conversation were both very good value and the evening was a great delight.

We arranged to see them again in the south in July and September.

The flying bird of the day is a goldfinch.

goldfinch

Those interested can find details of my cycle ride by clicking on the map below.

garmin route 18 April 2017

It was a pity that the sun didn’t last for very long.

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Today’s guest  photograph comes from Dropscone who is on holiday in Skye.  He managed to take a rather clever picture of himself taking a picture of a rainbow.

Dropscone

After yesterday’s dull, drizzly day following a good forecast, we had a sunny, bright day today following a very gloomy forecast of frequent showers.  The general forecasts remain pretty sound but the detailed local forecasts are sometimes rather ropey.

Still, we were very grateful for a good day.

I took a couple of pictures of the effects of yesterday’s rain…

lupin and pulsatilla

A lupin holding a watery diamond and a battered pulsatilla

…and set off to cycle round my 20 mile Canonbie circle.   Although the temperature was in single figures and the sun wasn’t out, the lack of wind made it feel quite pleasant for cycling and I went round at a good speed. Since I wasn’t having to battle the breeze, I was much more in the mood to stop and take pictures so I paused for a primrose, waited for a wood anemone, dawdled for a dandelion and ran out of alliteration for a bluebell.

primrose, wood anemone, dandelion, bluebell

The dandelions and anemones were out in force near Canonbie.

anemones and dandelions

I stopped on the Hollows Bridge to show that the trees are getting a welcome green tinge.

Hollows Bridge

By the time that I got home, the sun had come out so I mowed the middle and front lawns and took a lot of flower pictures.

violet, bergenia, pulmonaria and fritillary

Dog tooth violet, bergenia, pulmonaria and fritillary

berberis, wallflower, hellebore and tulip

berberis, wallflower, hellebore and tulip

tulip waving goodbye

Tulip dead heading will shortly be required

There were quite a few bees to be heard and I was very pleased to see some of them at work on the plum tree….

tulip waving goodbye

…though the forecast of a frost tonight might be too much for the blossoms.

I think that the tadpoles are far enough on to survive a cold night.

chaffinches

It was such a nice spring day by this time, although still not as warm as it should be on a sunny day in April, that I went into the house and took three shots of the garden from upstairs windows.

The front beds, the front lawn and the pond (on the right)

The front beds, the front lawn and the pond (on the right)

The plum tree, the middle lawn and the biggest flower beds

The plum tree, the middle lawn and the biggest flower beds (and a glimpse pf the gardener).

The vegetable garden and the compost bins

The vegetable garden and the compost bins

This doesn’t show the beds along the front of the house and the small area to the right of the greenhouse.

The birds were pleased when I filled the feeders before I went cycling and by the time that I got back they had got the level well down again.

chaffinches

We wanted to do some shopping at Gretna so we took advantage of the continuing sunshine by packing the bikes into the car after lunch and going for a cycle ride before we did the shopping.

The advantage of cycling from Gretna from Mrs Tootlepedal’s point of view in particular is that the roads are mostly flat but this didn’t mean that we had a dull outing.

Todhills horses

Bridge of trees at Todhills

Mrs Tootlepedal passing under an arch of trees

We went south from Gretna and cycled round a 12 mile loop that took us through Rockliffe.  After passing through the village, we took advantage of a rough track to cycle down to the bank of the river Eden.  We were able to look back at the church where we took a walk a week or so ago.

Rockcliffe church

Which ever way we looked, up or down the river, the view was delightful.

River Eden

Up river

River Eden

Down river

And the bank itself was covered with a lovely little wood.

Rockcliffe wood

We were a bit alarmed by some very black clouds ahead of us as we cycled back to Gretna but they passed over to the north before we got back to the car and we enjoyed an excellent cycle ride.

The 12 miles had given us an appetite so a cup of coffee and a cake was necessary before we completed some satisfactory shopping.  (Slippers were the main thing on the list but quality prunes came into it too.)

We got home to find that the rain shower had missed Langholm as well.  This was lucky as we had had washing hanging out.  I had to fill the feeders again as they were quite empty by this time.

chaffinches

Cycling and shopping had taken up most of the afternoon and it wasn’t long before it was time for our evening meal and then I went out to play trios with Mike and Isabel.

We haven’t played for some weeks as Mike and Isabel have been busy on church matters over the Lent period and it was very good to get back to playing again.  The time off hadn’t got too much rust into the works so we enjoyed our playing a lot.

Sometimes, I can just push the shutter button in the nick of time to catch a flying bird and today was one of those times.

chaffinches

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Today’s guest picture is another from a visit that my brother Andrew made to the River Dove.  ‘Rock Cottage’ is set into the cliff beside the river and manages to look like a rock and a cottage at the same time.

rock cottage

We had another dry and breezy day here with the temperature struggling to get into double figures (10°C – 50°F) and the wind still on the chilly side so I had to wrap up well when I went out on my bike to do the twenty mile Canonbie circuit.  It was one of those days.  I thought that I was trying harder and going faster than the last time that I made the same trip but I still managed to take three minutes longer.

Of course I was three days older so that may have explained it.

The cold, breezy weather doesn’t encourage stopping for photos but I did stop once for a breather and a look at a couple of bare trees.

Irvine House trees

When I got back, Mrs Tootlepedal was busy in the garden so I walked round enjoying the results of her work.

It was quite bright for a while and the tulips were looking good.

yellow tulip

tulips

Ballerinas dancing in the wind

tulips and daffodils

tulip centres

Two of my favourite centres. I think of the one on the left as ‘plums and custard’

The grape hyacinths are good at forming pools even if they don’t quite constitute a river.

hyacinths

The dog tooth violets are thriving….

dog tooth violet

…but are keen to turn their backs on me.  The cowslippy things are more polite.

cowslips

And I think that we could call this a colourful corner.

colourful corner

I didn’t have long to spend in the garden, although I did as much dead heading of daffodils as I could, because we had to set off to Lockerbie after lunch to visit Matilda in Edinburgh.

I found a moment to look out of the kitchen window while my soup was heating up.

flying goldfinch

A seed is wasted by disputatious birds

flying goldfinch

A siskin is unmoved by a hard stare from a goldfinch.

siskin and chaffinch

And another is more than ready to repel an invading chaffinch

I have mentioned Lockerbie Station a lot so here is a picture to show it in all its glory.  It has the air of one of those stations on a model railway layout.

Lockerbie Station

I wandered up the platform while I was waiting for our train, which was a little late, and was very taken by this lonely diesel locomotive which came shuffling down the track in the opposite direction.

diesel loco at Lockerbie

We arrived safely in Edinburgh and took the bus down to Matilda’s.  Some people might think that a city bus could be a little dull but this bus took a very scenic route.  I was fortunate to find a vacant seat upstairs and at the front.

view from the 104

view from the 104

Matilda was in good form when we arrived.  Her other grandparents were visiting too so she had no shortage of adults willing to give her their best attention.  In fact she found the attention a little too much and retired behind some very fashionable shades.

Matilda

Her ‘other’ granny can be seen in the background

Before you ask, I thought that everyone knew that specs are being worn upside down this year.  It is de rigeur.

We had a very good time and it seemed almost no time at all before it was time for us to leave and catch our train home.  The view from the bus was good again…..

The Royal Mile

…and the view from the bus stop in Prince Street was even better.

view from Princes Street

Our journey home was improved by sharing a portion of chips from the chip shop in Lockerbie.

The flying bird of the day is a goldfinch doing the breaststroke.

flying goldfinch

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Today’s guest picture comes from my son Tony.  He took his dogs to Loch Lomond today and they seem to be enjoying the outing.

Tony's dogs

I spent the early part of the morning hoping that it would get a bit warmer and when I thought that it had, I got the fairly speedy bike out and went off to Port Carlisle for lunch.

Port Carlisle is on the southern shore of the Solway and getting there has been greatly helped by the excellent bike path along the new Carlisle by-pass.  The route along the coast is pretty flat in general and very flat in places.

Tony's dogs

The notice in the foreground tells you that the water is one foot deep if it gets to the sign

The Solway was looking very amiable if a bit hazy.

Solway near Drumburgh

I had an excellent lunch at the pub in Port Carlisle and then went back pretty well the same way that I came.

I stopped near Rockliffe to take a picture of one of my favourite trees…

Rockcliffe tree

..and thought that it might look good in black and white and had another go.

Rockcliffe tree

I stopped several more times for refreshment and relaxation on the way back but only took three more pictures while having a breather at the top of the steep hill at Tarcoon.

tarcoon hill

It was a very pleasant day but too hazy to get good landscape pictures

Whita Hill

The rough pasture is still looking rather wintery. It will taken another month for the hills to go green again.

We haven’t got to the time when the verges are full of various wild flowers but there are a lot of celandines about to start the season off.

celandines

In spite of feeling a bit of stiffness in one of my calf muscles, I did the 70 miles at just over 14 mph, which these days is the best that I can expect until it gets a bit warmer in the mornings.

When I got back, there was exciting news.  The new compost bins have arrived and are ready to be assembled when I have shifted the compost out of the old bins.  Expect exciting pictures soon.

Mrs Tootlepedal was hard at work in the garden so I had a walk round to look at what was going on.  There were a lot of tulips to admire.

tulips

The day had got pleasantly warm by this time and it was a joy to be out in the garden among such a feast of colour.

tulips

tulips

I was moved to try an arty shot or two.  These are just as the camera saw them.  I haven’t pepped them up in the editor.

tulips

tulips

tulips

Mrs Tootlepedal is pleased with a new bed of tulips planted for this season.

tulips

I am very pleased with the plum blossom…

plum blossom

…but unless a few more bees turn up, I will have to get busy with my soft paint brush again.

The feeders needed filling so I must have missed a lot of bird action while i was pedalling.  A redpoll put a chaffinch in its place.

redpoll and chaffinch

In the evening, we went to a performance by a group called Spatz &Co at the Buccleuch Centre.  They describe themselves as a showband and play an entertaining and eclectic mix of rock and roll, jazz, swing, and superior popular songs by John Lennon, Paul Simon, Billy Joel and Gerry Rafferty.

The sound balance on the night between the rhythm section and the front line wasn’t ideal but they were full of pep and excellent players.  There was a disappointingly small audience but it was very enthusiastic and we that hope they come again.

Although i only did two things, it somehow felt like quite a full day.

I just had time for a flying bird.

flying chaffinch

Those interested can click on the map below to get details of the bike ride.

garmin route 9 april 2017

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from Tom in South Africa.  He was in a position to see the famous Table Mountain but found it covered by the cloud known as the Table Cloth.

Table Mountain

We had another dry and cloudy day here today.  In theory it was quite warm but in practice a real chill in the wind made it feel decidedly parky and it was a day for keeping a coat on if you were outside.

Mrs Tootlepdal went off to Hawick after breakfast on embroidery business and I entertained Dropscone to a cup of coffee (accompanied by some of his traditional Friday treacle scones, still warm from the stove).

After he left, I went out and did some grass cutting and compost sieving.  I am trying to get Bin D emptied so that I can start the process of turning the other bins.  I am getting two new bins made to replace Bin A and Bin B which are showing the same signs of dilapidation as their owner so I need a bit of space to get the new bins into position.

They should be here next week so I am quite excited.

I found a moment or two to watch the birds. They are still in deep discussion about the merits of Brexit and the Trump administration.

chaffinch and goldfinch

Sometimes things get heated….

siskin and redpoll

…and there are signs of a hard landing…

siskins

…but other birds are anxious to join in the debate…

Goldfinch leaving plum tree

….it was rare but sometimes harmony broke out and birds flew side by side instead of straight into each other.

side by side flying

The chilly, sunless weather over the past few days has put flower development on hold for the most part but the daffodils are still looking good…

daffodil

…and a marsh marigold has appeared in the pond.

marsh marigold

Mrs Tootlepedal returned from Hawick in time for a bowl of red soup for a late lunch and when she had finished, she went out into the garden to take advantage of the dry spell.  I made a loaf of bread in the bread machine and got the fairly speedy bike out and set off to do the same 20 mile ride as yesterday.

I did stop for a photo or two today.  The interesting cow at Canonbie was resting…

Canonbie cow

…but it had arranged for a substitute to be available for passing photographers.

Canonbie cow

I stopped near Irvine House for a banana and a drink of water and fortunately chose an flourishing piece of wall to lean my bike against.

It was the wall that had everything.

moss and lichen on wall

It was mostly covered with moss…

lichen

…but where a stone was exposed, it was covered with lichen….

canonbie lichen

….of varying colour…

Canonbie wall

…and varieties.

The wind was cold but not unhelpful and after grinding into it up the hill for the first five miles at a snail’s pace, I did the last 15 miles in well under an hour.  Interestingly (to me at least) I ended up doing the ride in the same time as yesterday to within a minute.   I may be slow but I am consistent.

When I got back, I had a look at the yew topiary in the middle of the garden and signs of nibbling made me feel that Attila the Gardener might have been at work….

yew bush

…and a look round the other side, showed that drastic surgery had indeed been undertaken.

In my role as  Onegesius, Attila’s loyal assistant, I lent a hand in sawing off the ball on top of the bush, clipping a bit here and there…

 

yew bush

… and soon the bush was transformed.  I then helped in tidying up the debris and in no time, everything looked quite calm again.

yew bush

Mrs Tootlepedal gave the ravaged bush some TLC and we have every hope that the side that has been trimmed savagely will soon start to grow again.

It was getting too tall for us to clip easily and it was also encroaching on the path to the bridge over the pond so action had to be taken.

Mrs Tootlepedal had purchased some mutton chops from a traditional butcher in Hawick and she cooked these for our tea.  They were very good.

In the evening, Mike and Alison Tinker came round and Alison and I had one of those hours of playing where we were definitely better than the last time we played the same pieces. It is always enjoyable to play good music but it is more enjoyable if you play better than the week before so this rounded off the day very well.

We are promised a little sunshine tomorrow which will be very welcome.

The flying bird of the day is a chaffinch.

flying chaffinch

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from our daughter Annie.  She has been working hard in her allotment and has got a nice selection of seeds doing what seeds do.

Annie's seed trays

The forecast said “Rain later” but the morning was a continuation of our sunny spell with the added benefit of enough haze about to keep the temperature up.  Under the circumstances, the obvious thing to do was to get out the fairly speedy bike and go for a ride so I did exactly that.

The question of what to wear was important.  The temperature when I started was about 6° or 7°C which is by no means warm but it was bound to be warmer as the day went on so the trick was to find a combination which wouldn’t let me freeze at the start or boil at the finish.

The wise reader will say that one can start with an extra layer and take it off as the day warms up and this is true but harder to do for your feet and legs and head and if you have to take gloves, overshoes, skull caps and jerseys off then you have to stow them somewhere and that means carrying bags….and so on.  Still, I made a one off choice and was a bit chilly at the start and a little hot at the finish but quite contentedly so in both cases.  I did swap gloves for mitts at Eccelefechan.

I should add that this is only a problem for the older cyclist.  The young ones just put on shorts and a vest and go out regardless.

The wind was light, the roads were empty and the route choice was good so I enjoyed my ride.

lambs at Bigholms

It really felt like spring and I was serenaded by lambs in many places on the ride.

Paddockhole Bridge

 I love this bridge at Paddockhole because the riparian owners have clearly heeded my plea to make bridges accessible to passing photographers.  The banks used to be covered with scrub.  All bridges should be like this.

The bridge crosses the Water of Milk and I always enjoy looking at the Water further along as it snakes through the hills.

Water of Milk

You can see from the picture above that it was  very hazy  so I took no views today.

I cycled along the Lockerbie road but turned off a few miles before the town to follow the Water of Milk down its valley.

The road crosses the main railway line and the motorway and between the two I stopped between where a new road has been constructed to cross the motorway.  I walked a short way down the old road to find a little bridge crossing a tributary of the Water of Milk.

Water of Milk

There were laid back lambs in the field here….

Castlemilk lambs

…and a magnificent roadside tree.

Castlemilk tree

This was the most scenic part of my route (and the hilliest) and for the next section I pedalled along the rather dull old A74 to Gretna.  I stopped for a snack at Ecclefechan and parked my bike against a concrete post well supplied with lichen….

concrete lichen

…and while I ate my banana, I enjoyed the wildflowers beside the road…

ecclefechan wildflowers

…and the sensible energy choices of a householder and a small business in the village.

ecclefechan green energy

I kept an eye out for spring in the hedges as I pedalled down the long straight road to Gretna and it wasn’t hard to find some evidence.

Blackthorn

There was plenty of blackthorn in bloom

Willow

I don’t know for certain what this is but I suspect it might be willow

I was following well travelled roads after Gretna so I kept my camera in my pocket and concentrated on getting home.  I was once again seized by decimal fever when I got into the town and had to cycle right through it and go a mile out of the other side so that I could ring up an exact 50 miles for the outing.

This took me to just over 500 miles for the month and left me ahead of schedule for the year so I cannot complain about March from a cycling point of view at all.

I had enough energy for a stroll round the garden when i got home  (Mrs Tootlepedal was busy there already of course).

frog

There is a steady supply of frogs peeping through the weeds in the pond at the moment.

There was nothing new in the floral department to catch the eye but the weather for the next few days is going to be warm and wet so I am expecting quite a bit of growth.

I did see a most unusual large bumble bee with a very red back but this was the best picture that I could get of it.

bumble bee

I think that it is probably a tree bumble bee, a relatively new arrival in Scotland which would explain why I have never seen one before.

I did think of sieving some compost and mowing a lawn but strangely found sitting down and having a cup of tea and a biscuit with Mrs Tootlepedal more attractive.

I looked out of the window though.

The large flock of siskins which has been eating me out of house and home has moved on, leaving one or two to come to the feeder but there were plenty of chaffinches and goldfinches to fill the gap.

chaffinches and goldfinches

Spot the single siskin at the top of the picture.

Some bad bird has made off with two of the perch bars for one of the feeders but goldfinches are quite good at clinging on to the feeder regardless.

chaffinches and goldfinches

I had to pay a routine visit to the Health Centre to top up my system and when I got back, another look out of the window was rewarded with a sighting of a redpoll in very bright raiment.

redpoll

Attracting female attention is the name of the game.

Not long afterwards, the promised rain arrived so I was very pleased to have made good use of the recent fine weather by cycling every day for the last six days.

The flying bird of the day is a chaffinch trying to work out where the missing perches are.

flying chaffinch

Those interested may get further details of the ride by clicking on the map below.

garmin route 28 March 2017

The calorie counter is a fantasy.  I ended the ride heavier than I started!

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