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Posts Tagged ‘hawkweed’

Today’s guest picture comes from Bruce’s trip to Sweden and shows the Stockholm’s Gröna Lund amusement park as seen from the water.  With my head for heights, there would be little amusement there for me.

stockholm funfair

We had another fine and sunny day today with light winds, just perfect for cycling.  The day had been provided by those amusing weather gods as they knew perfectly well that I had arranged to take my good bike into the bike shop for its annual service this morning.  I could hear them chuckling as I drove down the road to drop the bike off.

However, I had other things to do in the absence of cycling and having put the bike in for its service, I drove further south and enjoyed an informative and useful singing lesson from Mary, the now ex-musical director of our Langholm choir as she has retired from the post.  She is an excellent teacher and if I keep going, I may even become a singer.  I live in hope.

I got home about lunch time and would have gone to the Buccleuch Centre for lunch with Mrs Tootlepedal if we hadn’t remembered that it is shut on a Monday.  Instead we brought an egg roll from our corner shop and lunched modestly at home.

After lunch, I suggested that Mrs Tootlepedal might enjoy a ten mile cycle ride using the newly repaired Tarras road and was delighted when she agreed.  We set off for a gentle excursion with wild flowers in mind.

It is an undulating route with plenty of slow sections were there is time to scan the verges…

yellow wild flowers tarras road

The hawkweed was very prolific at one point and as it was on the longest of the hills, I was happy to stop and take a picture while Mrs Tootlepedal headed ever upwards.

yellow hawkweed

I caught up with her in time to catch her enjoying the smooth surface on the newly repaired road…

Ally on new road tarras

..and she rolled on down the hill and took a moment to admire the view from the bridge at the bottom.

tarras bridge

This was the view that she was admiring.

tarras cascade

As we went up out of the valley on the other side of the bridge, we were going slowly enough to note tightly wound thistle buds, cheerful daisies, baleful horsetail and a fine grass, possibly Yorkshire Fog.

dull wild flowers

And it was here that we saw the best treat of the day, a lone orchid.

first orchid

When we got to Claygate, we headed on down the hill….

going down to Byreburn

…and did a little gentle off road cycling along the track beside the Byre Burn.

fairy loup track june

Normally it is illegal for a man with a camera to pass the Fairy Loup waterfall, which is beside this track, without stopping to take a picture, but the leaves on the trees are so lush at the moment that I could hear the waterfall but I couldn’t see it at all today.

We got down to the Esk at Hollows and took the old A7 bike route home.  We had passed many wild geraniums on our way and I took this picture to represent them all.

wild gernanium

Before we set out, I had asked Mrs Tootlepedal to keep a special eye out for ragged robin as I thought it was about the right time to see this pretty plant, and she duly spotted a clump near Irvine House.

ragged robin

I was keeping my special eye out for yellow rattle and not far from the ragged robin, I was rewarded with a sighting.

yellow rattle

I looked it up when I got home and can tell you that Rhinanthus minor, the yellow rattle, little yellow rattle, hayrattle or cockscomb, is a flowering plant in the genus Rhinanthus in the family Orobanchaceae, native to Europe, northern North America, and Western Asia.  I thought that you might like to know that.  There is obviously a lot of it about.

yellow rattle (2)

Nearby, a clump of vetch was playing host to a large number of bees.

bees omn vetch

My final picture from the outing was this set of developing larch cones….

three larch cones

…taken just before we joined the main road for the last couple of miles home when we were too busy thinking about passing cars to worry about wild flowers.

Luckily from the point of view of taking pictures of flowers in the verges and not getting too hot while cycling, the sun had retired behind some handy clouds for most of our trip, but it was out and shining again when we got home.  As a result, after I had had a cup of tea, i went out into the garden and scarified the front lawn.

I was rather dashed to find that there were three full wheelbarrows of moss to be cleared when the scarifier had finished its work.  I had hoped that I was winning in the battle against the moss, but it is more like a stalemate at the moment.

Then my flute pupil Luke came and we practised a simple arrangement of a Scott Joplin tune which I had acquired from the internet at a modest price.  It is a wonderful world where I can think that I might like to play a piece by Joplin, look on the internet, find a piece, buy it, print it out and be playing it within five minutes of having had the idea.

After Luke went, I had a walk round the garden in the evening sun and enjoyed Mrs Tootlepedal’s French rose…

rosarie de

…and a glowing Icelandic poppy (the dead header needs to work harder)….

icelandic poppy

…and the argyranthemums which Mrs Tootlepedal has planted out in the chimney pot outside the kitchen window.

argyranthemum in chimney pot

A new clematis has come out near the pond.

purple clematis

Then it was time for tea, a second helping of yesterday’s slow cooked beef stew.

Since it was still a lovely evening after tea, I improved the shining  hour by mowing the middle lawn.  I am definitely winning the battle against the moss there.

In all this activity, I didn’t have any time to spend watching the birds, so there is no flying bird of the day today.  A flower of the day appears in its place,  a case of going from the  sublime sparrow to the ranunculus.

pale ranunculus

 

 

 

 

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Today’s guest picture is another from Venetia’s visit to the misty mountains of Madeira.

madeira

As I am still resting my singing voice under doctor’s orders, Mrs Tootlepedal went by herself to sing in the church choir while I kept myself busy at home.

I may have occasionally glanced about as I went about my business…

butter and sugar iris

more butter and sugar irises are out

…but there was washing to be hung out….

yellow onion

and a handsome yellow oniony sort of thing has come out too

…lawns to be mowed…

lupins

the kindly weather has meant that the lupins are out from bottom to top of their stems

…and watered…

lupin close up

.and worth a closer look as well

…the car windscreen to be cleared of huge amounts of squashed insects (we had hardly any insects last year bit this year numbers seem to have recovered)….

philadelphus with roses

a large philadelphus with a scattering of roses in the back corner of the front lawn

…a second load of washing to be hung out…

astrantia

a garden in a single flower

…a sausage stew to be prepared for the slow cooker…

foxgloves

foxgloves are popping up everywhere

…and quite a bit of watering to be done too….

spirea bridal wreath

a better look at the tiny spirea flowers

…in spite of a forecast of thunderstorms later in the day (after yesterday’s disappointments, we weren’t taking the forecast seriously)…

lamium

and the lamium has burst in flower too

…so there was hardly any time to look at flowers at all.

hawkweed and white flowers

 

Mrs Tootlepedal is considering scattering more of the white flowers among the orange hawkweed for next year.  I think that that would be a good idea.

I did take a look at the hydrangea on the wall of the house.  Uninstructed people like me might imagine that the big white things are the important part of the flowers….

hydrangea

…but bees know better where the real interest lies.

bee on hydrangea

A blackbird took advantage of the lawn watering to have a quick shower.

blackbird having shower

Mrs Tootlepedal returned from church and got busy in the garden.

After lunch, we spent the afternoon waiting for the rain to come.  We were entertained by some prolonged rumbles of thunder but the lightning that caused them must have been a good distance away as we saw no evidence of it at all.

monument from garden

In spite of some very dark skies to the north of the town, the monument stayed bathed in sunshine and only a few drops of rain came with the thunder.

I had taken a camera upsatirs in the hope of some lightning shots but had to make do with looking at the birds instead.  They came to the feeder below the window, apparently quite unworried by the rumbling overhead.

goldfinch

goldfinch (2)

Two siskins felt the need to quarrel.

fighting siskins

It did start to rain more heavily eventually and for a while, it looked as though it was going to take things seriously but in the end, we only got a couple of short showers, enough to wet the garden which was welcome but not enough to store up some moisture on the ground for the future.

Now the threat of thunder and lightning has receded, I hope to get out on the bike again next week.

The flower of the day is the  Ooh La La Clematis, a pretty flower with an awful name.

Ooh La La clematis

 

 

 

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Today’s guest picture was sent by our daughter Annie and shows the ‘fruits’ of her labours in her allotment.  She benefits from being 300 miles south of us so she is well ahead in her growing season.

annies veg

After two days of rain, as recorded by our scientific rain gauge….

rain gauge

…we were treated to a pleasantly sunny day today which was very welcome.  Somewhat less welcome was the boisterous wind that came with the sunshine.

As I haven’t cycled at all in June so far, I would have liked to have made use of the sunshine to put a few miles in but just as I am not supposed to cycle up steep hills with my new knee, it is probably not a good idea to cycle long distances into a very strong wind.  I made the sensible choice and cycled up and down the four miles to Cleuchfoot three times so that I got a break from the wind every four miles.

The wind was gusting at well over 30 mph and I was grateful for the shelter offered by the Wauchope valley but I still had to pay attention, as once or twice I was buffeted by an unexpected gust that threatened to tip me into the gutter.  All the same, it was good to be out on the bike and there were plenty of excuses to stop and take a picture.

Wauchope Water cascade

The Wauchope was in an ebullient mood

Logan water

Its tributary, the Logan Water, was more peaceful

I saw a crop of fungus by a rotten tree branch…

fungus

…and the first signs of wild irises and hedge roses.  There are a lot of thistles around.

iris, rose and thistles

An old friend was once again standing on the sluice for the dam at Pool Corner.

heron

The road to Cleuchfoot is a picture on a day like today.

road to Cleuchfoot

Mrs Tootlepedal was at work in the garden when I got back and I walked around to see what there was to see.  The rain and wind had done remarkably little damage but I was grateful for a lost petal on a poppy that gave me a good view of the internal workings of the flower.

poppy

There were quite a lot more bees and hoverflies about today and I spent some time chasing them but the strong wind blowing the flowers about made finding a bee still enough to photograph almost impossible.

There were several tree bumble bees about and I think this is the first year that we have seen them in our garden so I have put them in in spite of being a bit fuzzy.

tree bumble bees

Tree bumble bees in the centre and right hand pictures

I had more luck after lunch with a frog in the pond. (With apologies to my Blackpool reader who really doesn’t like frogs at all.)

frog

I mowed the front and middle lawns and then enjoyed the sight of the orange hawkweeds turning their faces to the sun…

orange hawkweed

…before waving Mrs Tootlepedal goodbye as she went off with an armful of books to visit a friend recovering from  a badly broken leg.

Once she had gone, I got my walking poles out and headed off for a walk to summit of Warbla (275m).

I was walking up the track through the fields at the Stubholm when I was confronted by a small animal standing firmly in the middle of the road giving me  a hard stare.  I got my camera out, fully expecting that it would run away before I could focus and was greatly surprised when it headed straight towards me.

brown hare

It paused for a moment a few yards in front of me to get a proper picture taken and then plopped gently into the bushes beside the track.  I am not an expert on wildlife but I think it was  a young brown hare.

I passed a number of hawthorn bushes on my way to the open hill.  The glorious blossom of a week or so ago has gone but they are still interesting to look at….

hawthorn

…to me at any rate.

I plodded on up the track, greatly aided by my walking poles, and was soon able to look back on some splendid views.  I took a panorama from the summit and those who wish can click on the picture to get a better view.

Warbla panorama

I had a bit of difficulty using the camera as the wind was so brisk that my eyes were perpetually full of tears but I took a more conventional shot as well.

Langholm from Warbla

(I  might have used a filter on that picture.)

I could also make out the oldest graveyard in the town, lying beside the Kirk Wynd (up which the horsemen gallop on Common Riding day).

Auld Kirk Yard

The church (now demolished)  that stood beside the graveyard had no flooring and parishioners who wanted to keep their feet dry on muddy days had to bring their own plank to rest their feet on.

I couldn’t get a very sharp picture of it because although the churchyard wasn’t moving, the strong wind meant that the slightly tottery photographer on the top of the hill was waving about a lot.

The ridge leading from the summit to the west was covered in bog cotton to the extent that it almost looked as though it had snowed.

bog cotton

On my way down, I took a view of the monument on Whita Hill where I had walked last week.

Monument from Warbla

I have ‘disappeared’ the unsightly police mast further along the summit.

I got back just after Mrs Tootlepedal had returned from her sick visit so we had a cup of tea and I finished the crossword.

After our evening meal, we went up to the town to sing with a small choir that has been formed to sing three songs in the Common Riding concert.  Various commitments meant that many prospective members weren’t there but there were enough of us there to have a go and I had the pleasure of singing the bass line for change, as there were no other basses present.  Luckily, it was quite an easy line and didn’t go too low.

The flying bird of the day is a bee leaving a philadelphus.

bee

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Today’s guest picture comes from my Newcastle correspondent, Fiona and shows her resident garden hedgehog on the left with one of four new hoglets on the right.  She thinks that the hoglet is three or four weeks old.  We are very envious.

fiona's hedgehogs

We had a slightly cooler but still sunny day.  With our final concert of the season due tomorrow and a brisk breeze blowing, I decided that once again a reasonably restful day would be sensible with the added advantage that it would give me time to keep looking at the songs which we have to learn by heart.

I wasn’t entirely idle.

I started the day with some shopping at the Producers’ Market at the Buccleuch Centre and then went on a bee hunt with my macro lens.  I haven’t by any means mastered using the macro lens and the results tend to be very hit and miss so although I got quite a good fly picture…

fly

…I managed to get a sharper picture of some of the petals of an allium than I did of the bee that I was trying to catch as it approached the flower.

bee and allium

And I managed to take a wonderful picture of the bees knees….

bees knees

…when I was trying to capture its head.

I was sometimes a bit more successful…

bee on azalea

…but I hope that I will get some more sunny days soon to hone my skills.

I had two goes at an orange hawkweed with variable results as well.

orange hawkweed

orange hawkweed

Still, there are obviously a lot of possibilities and I will stick in.

I had a cup of coffee and went back out for more floral fun.

tropaeolum

The tropaeolum has survived the drastic pruning of the yew and is looking promising.

The white spirea is covered in flowers with what look like rather spotty petals…

spirea

…but a closer look shows that the spots are not on the petals but floating on front of them.

spirea

Once again, I am in awe of the amount of varied detail Mother Nature has put into designing her flowers.

On the more colourful side of things, large poppies are popping up….

poppy

…and Lilian Austin has spread her wings.

lilian austin rose

I liked these two irises in a shady corner…

iris

…and in complete contrast, these two Sweet Williams blazing in the sunshine.

sweet williams

I found a snail hanging upside down on the surface of the pond, perhaps trying to keep an eye on the tadpole below.

snail

I quite often see snails like this and I don’t know whether they have had an accident or are just warming themselves in the sunshine.

Two final flowers for the day, an allium on the way out but still looking very pretty…

allium

…and a climbing hydrangea on the way in.  It will soon make up in quantity for what it lacks in individual interest.

hydrangea

After lunch I mowed the middle lawn and the drying green and then settled down to some serious composting work.  I finished sieving the contents of Bin D (the most mature of the bins) and distributed the results on various vegetable beds and then I surprised myself by turning Bin C into the empty Bin D, then Bin B into the empty Bin C and finally Bin A into the empty Bin B.  When I had finished, it all looked like his….

compost Bins

…much like it did before but now with all the compost shifted a metre to the right.  Bin A, on the left, is empty and ready for fresh material to be created by Attila the gardener.

Some people may well wonder why I don’t just leave the compost to rot where it is and stop bothering it all the time.  This is a fair question but then what would I do for fun?

Actually, turning the compost speeds up the decomposition process and beaks up any stubborn layers of material that are refusing to decompose properly and are just sitting half way down the pile in a sullen, soggy lump.  Big systems using continuous turning methods can make compost in seven days.

To add to our composting joy, Mrs Tootlepedal received a gift of three bottles of liquid worm compost from Mike Tinker’s wormery.

worm pee

In a suitably ecological way, she collected it by bicycle.

Suitably diluted, this is very good stuff to add to the garden.

The flying bird of the day is a bee with a prominent proboscis.

flying bee

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I was going to use pictures from our break as guest pictures of the day this week but I couldn’t resist this picture, taken by ‘Uncle Joe’, of Matilda, who is still in the south,  wondering when her parents and aunt will stop with the cheesy smiles and let her get on with her meal.

Matilda and family

This is the picture that I was going to use.  It shows Gold Hill in Shaftesbury.

Gold Hill in Shaftesbury

We woke to a wonderfully sunny day with the winds thankfully a bit lighter than yesterday.  Outside the kitchen window, a new poppy looked attractive….

poppy with hoverflies

…not just to me but to hoverflies as well.

I did a little dead heading and took the camera for a stroll among the flowers.  The pink poppies have some subtle differences when you look at them closely.

pink poppies

A frog was taking in the rays on a lily pad.

frog

The hostas have flowered profusely this year and are a  real ornament to the garden.

hostas

I was just thinking of mowing the lawn when Dropscone appeared on his bicycle…

Dropscone

…looking very cheerful.  I was cheerful too when I saw that he was bringing a bag of his scones to go with out coffee.  He had been playing a lot of golf while I was a way so we had much to mull over (cruel fate, unfortunate bounces, unnecessary trees etc.)

After coffee, I had a quick look at the plum tree…

unripe plums

…which has quite a few more good looking plums on it than we feared after a late frost threatened the crop earlier in the year and then I mowed the front lawn.  Luckily it wasn’t very warm in the town while we were away so the grass was manageable and looked quite good after its haircut.

Once the mower was put away, I had time to wander round the garden again.

Although most of the orange hawkweed has long gone over, there was a single cluster in almost full flower today.

orange hawkweed

We are entering the season of berries and the first few raspberries are ripening.  I would have shown you a picture but they seem to have disappeared suddenly and mysteriously.

Instead here are berries of the perennial nasturtium which have turned from green to blue and red, together with a cluster of rowan berries on their way to ripening.

berries

After lunch, I went out to have a look at the last of the early potatoes which Mrs Tootlepedal had just dug up.  For some reason the weather this year has produced relatively few potatoes per plant but to make up for this, they are unusually large for earlies.

early potatoes

They turn out to taste very good when baked.  This is not something that you would normally do with earlies.

The weather stayed fine so I got the fairly speedy bike out and tried out my legs after their week of rest.  They worked well so I battled into the breeze for ten and a half miles up the Lockerbie road and then cruised back home at 17 mph, an unusually brisk speed for me these days.  I didn’t stop for many pictures as I was concentrating hard on the pedalling but I did record this colourful verge near Westwater.

not dandelions

Definitely not dandelions

When I got back, I thought that the middle lawn was looking a bit peely-wally so I got out the watering can and put some pep-u-uppo on it.  I was just on the last can-ful when a looming presence over my left shoulder turned out to be Scott, the minister, paying me a visit.

He had arrived in perfect time to join us for a cup of tea (who would have thought it) and he told us about his adventures in the big London 100 mile bike ride at the end of last month.  For the second year running, accidents among riders ahead of him had caused long hold-ups and as a result the course had had to be shortened to a mere 90 miles.  This had been disappointing although not entirely unexpected with 26,000 riders taking part and some narrow roads involved.  He is hoping to do an uninterrupted 100 mile event elsewhere soon.

When he had gone, I went off on my slow bike to see if I could find any waterside birds.  I didn’t have to look far to find a herring gull.

herring gull

There was another gull near and I think that this may be a young herring gull but I am, as always, open to correction.

gull

As there were some very black looking clouds threatening to bring a fine day to a wet close, I didn’t dawdle and was soon home.

The Olympic Games are going to be a severe test of my ability to get things done over the next few days as there is wall to wall coverage available but I am going to try to ration myself so it doesn’t take over my whole life.

The flower of the day is a dahlia….

dahlia

And the flying bird is that herring gull.

flying herring gull

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from Bruce’s tour of the Mediterranean.  This is Dubrovnik.

Dubrovnik

My plan was to get up early and go for a cycle ride before the wind got too strong and I managed to get up quite early and go for a cycle ride but the wind was pretty strong anyway.

As I went for another ride in the afternoon and a walk in the evening, my day was pretty full and for some unknown reason, I am a bit tired when it comes to writing this post so I hope any mild incoherence will be pardoned by indulgent readers.

Needless to say, I took far too many pictures as it was a fine day from start to finish so there are a lot of mash ups as well to go with the babbling today.

The 40 mile morning ride involved dappled lanes…

Near Justicetown

…and main roads lined with buttercups and daisies…

A7 wild flowers

…and went well, if a trifle slowly because of the breeze.

I got home by mid day and wandered round the garden.  Things were glowing…

poppy and crown princess margareta

…really glowing…

orange hawkweed

…and I would have shown you some nice ripe strawberries if someone hadn’t eaten them.

There seem to be more bees and other insects about every day.

bees

 A sharp eyed reader noticed a small green bug on a photo of a lupin the other day.  When I looked at the lupins today, there were more of them about (bugs not sharp eyed readers).

lupins

Little green bugs must like lupins.

After lunch, Mrs Tootlepedal was in the mood for a trip to Canonbie for a cup of tea and a scone at the community cafe in the church there.  The wind had eased off a fraction and as the road to Canonbie runs along the bottom of the Esk valley beside the river, it is well sheltered and we got down in good order.  I went for the chocolate cake which was very good.

We stopped on the way back for an occasional photo opportunity.  A field near the village was being used for making silage and the machine was just starting to collect and bale the mowed grass as we went past on the way down.  By the time we had had our tea and come back on the way home, they had almost finished.

silage making

A task that might have taken many men all day in times gone past was now almost finished by one man and a machine in 36 minutes.

We saw some ragged robin and our first orchid of the year beside the road on our way, a welcome sight, and a huge giant hogweed beside the Esk in Langholm, a much less welcome development.

ragged robin, hogweed and orchid

There was time for a look at the birds….

redpoll and goldfinch

Plenty of colour from a redpoll and a goldfinch

….and another cup of tea when we got back from this thirteen mile excursion before Sandy arrived for the walk.  Mrs Tootlepedal gave us a lift in the car to our starting point, a mile out of town and then Sandy and I walked up a favourite track, along the hill and back down the Kirk Wynd into the town.  Although only about a mile and half in length, it was a walk of great variety.

It was still a lovely day and the brisk wind had the double benefit of keeping us pleasantly cool and keeping the midges away. It could hardly have been a better evening for a stroll.

We snapped away as we went along.

There were my favourite three trees, still standing although they have hardly enough wood to make one whole trunk between the three of them…

three trees

…there were views…

Ewes valley

Looking up the Ewes valley

…which changed in colour as the clouds rolled by over head.

Ewes valley

And there were views of clouds…

cloud over the monument

…but the weather stayed fine and after looking at as many growing things as we could…

wild flowers

…the sun was still shining as we dropped back down the Kirk Wynd into the High Street.

Kirk Wynd

I did try a little black and white on the way.

gate in black and white

…but when we got to the High Street, it was red all the way as Sandy kindly treated me to a glass of wine in The Eskdale Hotel to celebrate his birthday yesterday.

After this enjoyable pause, Sandy went off to the Archive Centre to do a little work and I rolled home across the suspension bridge, nodding to Mr Grumpy on the way.

heron

He was feeling the breeze.

In the midst of all this activity, I didn’t have time to catch a flying bird so I have put in two chaotic bird mixtures instead.

bird mixes

 

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Today’s guest picture shows the Adam Bridge at Kedleston Hall, which my sister Mary visited with my sister Susan and my brother Andrew recently.  (A description of their visit can be found on Susan’s blog.)

The Adam bridge, Kedleston HallWe had another grey and windy day today but, as a small consolation, it was a few degrees warmer than it has been.  It didn’t tempt me out on my bicycle though and I was happy to dawdle over the newspapers after breakfast and then welcome Sandy in for a cup of coffee.

Before Sandy arrived, I had a gentle tour of the flowerbeds, even though the poor light and windy conditions made photography a bit hit or miss.

peony

Mrs Tootlepedal has a promising crop of pale pink peonies coming along. This is the first of them.

orange hawkweed

The orange hawkweeds are getting multi headed

pansies

The pansies are putting on a better show all the time.

Wigela

The Weigela has come out in a rush.

pink

The first pink is crawling into the light.

I couldn’t resist a return to two pretty favourites.

iris

candelabra primula

The candelabra primulas are amazing vegetable constructions.

After lunch though, the tempo of the day increased and I put two weeks of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database in short order and then went out into the garden to see what there was to do.

Mrs Tootlepedal is busy putting the shrubs along the back fence into some sort of order so there was plenty of shredding to do and a little compost sieving gave me some simple pleasure and Mrs Tootlepedal the chance to enrich the soil in a flower bed.  Finally, I had a quick trim of the drying green.

The rain had been threatening all day without amounting to more than a single short shower so after the gardening, Mrs Tootlepedal and I went off to visit the same bridge at Westwater as we had yesterday.  We stuck to the road this time and didn’t pedal over any steep hills on the way.  There was a faint drizzle for the whole nine miles but it was so faint that it didn’t get us wet.

It did cramp my use of Pocketcam and I only stopped for one picture of some very striking yarrow,

yarrow

I didn’t see the insect until I looked at the photo.

We were talking to Mike Tinker outside the house just before we set off and we almost had to duck as two low flying military aircraft zoomed over the rooftops.  They were so low that even Pocketcam could catch one of them.

aircraft over roofWe had hardly cycled 300 yards before they appeared again, obviously having done a handbrake turn, and flew over us in the opposite direction. They were well below the top of our surrounding hills and made off up the Ewes valley.   I hope that the pilots were concentrating.

In the evening, I went off with Sandy to the Archive Centre where we put another couple of weeks of the index into the database.  We were amused to discover that the opening act at a new hall, converted from a furniture maker’s workshop into a place of public entertainment in 1890, was a troupe of performing Mexican donkeys.   They really knew how to have fun in those days.

We had to have a glass of wine afterwards to recover.

The flying bird of the day is sparrow.

flying sparrow

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