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Posts Tagged ‘St John’s Wort’

Today’s guest picture comes from my Somerset correspondent Venetia.  She visited the Haynes International Motor Museum with my sister Mary and saw many wonderful motor cars, including this 1900 Clement Voiturette.

1900 Clement Voiturette

When you look back at them, there are some days which seem to rather slip through your grasp and you never really get a grip on them.  This was one such day.  Although we did quite a lot, nothing much seemed to happen.  As a result, if this post is somewhat disjointed, it will match the day very well.

We had a slow start after breakfast but then we drove down to the bike shop in Longtown to recover my set of car and house keys, which were still in my bike pannier along with my rain jacket.  My bike won’t be ready until Friday at best so we drove quietly back home, giving a lift to a local man who had just left his bike for repair at the bike shop and was intending to catch the bus back.  As he would have had to wait half an hour before the bus came, he was quite grateful.

It was a rather grey and gloomy day but still reasonably warm so we had a walk round the garden when we got back.  A blackbird on the fence caught my eye.  It had picked up a fallen rowan berry from the ground.

blackbird on fence with berry

It was just as well that it hadn’t been tempted by these St John’s Wort berries near by and they are poisonous to livestock and probably not very good for birds.

st john's wort berreis

Most of the Sweet Williams are past but this one, lurking in a vegetable bed, still looks rather attractive with its dainty blue boots.

sweet william

The honey suckle on the vegetable garden fence is doing well.

honeysuckle

I went in and put a grey day to some use by entering two weeks of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database, making a small dent in my backlog.

Mrs Tootlepedal occupied herself in making some plum chutney.  She tells me that we won’t be able to sample it for six months.

In the afternoon, I considered the weather and the forecast and the threats of heavy rain, and then went out for a short ride on my borrowed bike.

It was a day for cloudscapes…

cloudscape wauchope 1

…and no matter where you looked, there were plenty of clouds to see.

cloudscape wauchope 2

I had gone about four miles, when the view behind, with a hint of sunshine, looked a lot better than the view in front, and as it started to rain, I decided to race the rain back home.

cloudscape looking back to langholm

Although it continued to drizzle on me, the wind was coming from behind, so I didn’t get very wet at all. It was dry when i gt home.

I put the bike under cover and walked round the garden with Mrs Tootlepedal.  She has recently put down some grass seed to grow as green manure on the now empty potato bed, and this is of great interest to the sparrows who lurk in every convenient tree and hedge…

two sparrows

…and eat the seed whenever our backs our turned.

When  we came out, they flew up in a great cloud and some of them settled for a while on our neighbour Betty’s garage roof.  This is just a portion of the flock who were pecking at the grass seeds.

sparrows on betty's garage

I had a look at some flowers.  The lobelias round the chimney pot are in fine fettle…

lobelia at chimney

…and the late Lilian Austin rose, featured yesterday, has been joined by two more blooms.

three Lilian Austin roses

I tend to look at the phlox as a cloud of colour but this single flower was worth looking at by itself, I thought.

phlox blossom

After a while, the clouds seemed to have passed over, so after a last look at these zinnias, one with a miniature garden at its heart….

two zinnias

…I set off to complete my intended mileage for the day.  It started to rain almost as soon as I had left the house but I had my rain jacket with me, so I put it on and pressed ahead.

This was a good plan because the rain soon stopped and in spite of some impressive clouds over Callister…

callister cloudscape

…it turned into a sunny day as I came home from the top of the hill.

callister view

Although there was a break in the middle, I aggregated the two rides into one and recorded 20 miles for the day in my mileage chart.

When I got home, I walked round the garden for a final time….

striking nastrutium

…and then went in to print out some pictures for our camera club’s forthcoming exhibition.

Mrs Tootlepedal cooked an excellent evening meal and we rounded off the day by watching an exciting stage of the Vuelta.

The flying bird of the day was standing very close to me on the lawn before it flew off.

blackbird on lawn

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Today’s guest picture is another from my brother’s recent walk.  When the walkers stopped for lunch, a local resident pestered them for a share of their sandwiches and got very hoity toity when they refused.

andrew's peacock

We had some welcome sunshine today but I had a busy morning  and the only part of it that was spent  on my bike was when I cycled up to the High Street.  I was there to do some archiving business and take some pictures which I had printed out for a fellow camera club member up to her.  As our new archive base is in the newspaper office and the camera club member works there, I was able to hit two targets with a single arrow.

I got home in time to entertain Sandy to a cup of coffee.  He bought with him some delicious home made muffins which a friend had given to him.  We were able to send him off with some rhubarb and potatoes in return.

When he left, we went out to do some work in the garden.

I mowed the middle and front lawns and then took time out to have a walk round.

The sun  flowers continue to attract customers…

sunflower witht wo bees

…and the buddleias are equally popular.

four butterfly panel

Since it was a sunny day, I looked for sunny flowers and found a lot, some of them in the vegetable garden.

six yellow flowers

The St John;s Wort is a little garden paradise all on its own.

st john's wort august

Although I intended just to take yellow flowers today, in the end I couldn’t ignore the reds.

fuchsia, cosmos, poppies

The rambler rose is producing some late flowers.

late rambler rose

And some of the poppies are soldiering on.

red poppy

This is a  sweet pea…

sweet pea

…and this is a sweet bean.

sweet bean

Actually, it is a runner bean but its beans tasted pretty good when we had them for tea.

Having had a rest, I put the push mower away and got out the hover mower to do the greenhouse grass. I had to put it away pretty sharply though because it started to rain heavily.

I had just about got inside when the rain stopped.  I went out and it started again.  This happened a couple of times and then I had an idea.  I said very loudly to Mrs Tootlepedal, “I am giving up the idea of mowing and I am going in!”

Then  as soon as the rain moved off to annoy someone else, I nipped out and got the mowing finished.

I made some soup for lunch using an onion and some potatoes that didn’t look as though they would store well and after we had had lunch, I settled down to work on the computer as the weather continued to be unreliable.

I got the charity return for the Archive Group under way.  This was only nine months late, but that makes it quite prompt for me as I hate filling in forms and always leave it till the last possible moment (and beyond).

I was just copying some music as a relaxation after the form filling, when Mike Tinker popped in for a cup of tea and a ginger biscuit.

Not long after he left, my flute pupil Luke came and then it was time for tea. It had been a busy day.

The weather looked a bit settled by the time that we had finished our meal, so I suggested to Mrs Tootlepedal that we might try the walk that had been rained off yesterday. She thought that this was a good idea so we set off, armed with an umbrella this time just in case.

When you look at the size of the tree that was washed up on to the bank just before the Auld Stane Brig by last weekend’s flood, you can’t but feel that is was lucky that it didn’t go through the bridge and bang into it.

auld stane brig with tree

As we walked up the hill towards Hallcrofts, the sun came out and in typical fashion it also started to rain.  Luckily the sun stayed out and the rain soon went away, so that by the time that we had got to the track through the recently felled wood, it was a beautiful evening.

view down becks burn

Considering that the wood looked like this in February of last year…Becks wood felling

…the amount of new growth is amazing and instead of crossing the stream by a bridge surrounded by gloomy conifers, we walked among young ash trees and luxuriant grasses and plants.

becks burn bridge

Mrs Tootlepedal hadn’t visited the wood since before it was felled and she was staggered by the changes.

Having crossed the bridge and walked up to the track on the far side of the burn…

becks track

…we walked home very pleased with our decision to go on our walk.  We stopped on the way to admire a rainbow…

becks track rainbow

…and the view of Warbla in the evening sun…

view of warbla from becks track

…and to chat to friends whom we met along the way.

While I photographed the bigger picture, I asked Mrs Tootlepedal to keep en eye out for smaller things of interest.  She spotted scabious,  a well nibbled fungus, and a good crop of crab apples.

scabius, crab apple, fungus, be cks track

We got home at eight o’clock, conscious that the long summer nights are coming to an end in a month and shorter days will be back again all too soon.

The flying bird of the day is neither flying nor early but it has certainly got the worm.

blackbird with worms

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from our son Tony.  There are caves near his house in East Wemyss which have a rich history dating back to the Picts and some archaeologists are currently having a dig around to find out more.

smacap_Bright

It has been getting steadily warmer here, although nothing like the heatwaves in the USA and mainland Europe and although the morning was grey, it was quite warm enough to tempt Mrs Tootlepedal to put on her wellies and do some heavy clearing of old plants from the dam behind our house.

I was so busy wheeling barrow loads of soggy stuff round to our compost bins that I forgot to take any pictures of the activity, though when were finishing, I did spot a duck swimming in the part of the dam that our neighbour had previously cleared on the other side of the bridge.

duck on dam

When that task was finished, we had a cup of coffee and then Mrs Tootlepedal set about other garden business while I took a few pictures.

The poppies had perked up after being battered by the wind yesterday…

three poppies

…and I was pleased to find a lot of the taller flowers were still upstanding.

colourful border

A hosta flower stuck out its tongue for me…

hosta stamens

…and the St John’s Wort berries positively gleamed.

st johns wort berries

I was going to sit down on our new bench for a rest when I noticed that a verbena had sneaked though from behind the seat.

verbena and bench

The privet is a hive of activity.  Not only is it filling the garden with its scent, it has a continuous hum as you approach it, so full of bees is it.  I managed to spot a few today (and a butterfly out of the corner of my eye).

privet with bees

The individual flowers are very fancy with their rolled back petals and they cover the ground below the branches like snow when they fall.

Above the privet, the walnut tree is full of nuts again this year.  Whether the weather will be fine enough to ripen them is another question, but they are looking good at the moment.

walnuts

I noted the first crocosmia in the garden…

crocosmia

…and then went in for lunch, having picked masses more sweet peas and some garden peas to add to our summer soup.

As Mrs Tootlepedal pointed out, we could just keep the soup pot going for quite a time by adding more fresh veg every day, but we probably won’t.

I noted a couple of greenfinches had come to join the crowds on the feeder…

two greenfinches

..but once again, the chief seed eaters were siskins.

passing siskin

By the time that lunch was over, the wind had calmed down a lot and there was the promise of sun for the rest of the day.  I was almost waylaid by a stage of the Tour de France but as it was a flat stage with all the excitement in the last twenty seconds and still some hours away, I pulled myself together and went off to do some pedalling myself.

I did have a choice, since it was such a pleasant day, of a more hilly scenic ride or a slightly more boring and flat ride.  Luckily I chose the boring flat ride as it turned out that while my legs were very happy to co-operate while the going was easy, as soon as I hit a rise, they started to grumble tremendously.

There were no interesting views so I stopped occasionally if I saw something interesting in the verge…

wild flower with bee

…like this great burnet or sanguisorba officinalis.  There is a lot of grass about and I had a bit of trouble in finding a burnet flower without some grass in front of it.

great burnet and grass

The grass and its many seeds may be part of the reason that my legs were a bit unhelpful as grass pollen doesn’t help my breathing.

Still, as my route was largely flat after the first eleven miles, I plodded on down into England where I saw just about the most silver silver birch that I have ever seen.

silver birch

Still in England, I stopped beside the River Esk in Longtown to have a honey sandwich and admire the handsome bridge over the river.

Longtown bridge

After the recent rain, there was enough water in the river to to tempt a fisherman to put on his waders and have a go.

fisherman at Longtown

Thanks to adopting a very sensible speed, I managed to do fifty miles exactly before sinking into a chair in the kitchen and having a reviving cup of tea.  At a bit over 20°C (70°F), and with the sun beating down, it was as hot as I can cope with these days so I was pleased to find that the house was quite cool.

When I had finished my tea, I went out into the garden in pursuit of butterflies.  I had seen quite a lot of them on my ride, so I thought that there were bound to be some in the garden.

I was disappointed.

The fancy roses are trying to prove that Mrs Tootlepedal is wrong to think of replacing with them with simpler varieties…

rose in sunshine

…though these little red charmers which live very close to the ground would probably survive a cull anyway.

roses on ground

The astilbes were beautifully back lit.

backlit astilbe

I went in to enjoy a tasty evening meal, cooked by Mrs Tootlepedal, and then rather collapsed for the rest of the evening for some incalculable reason.

The flying bird of the day is a siskin.  It must have been feeling the heat too as it needed a friend to blow strongly just to keep it in the air.

flying siskin blown up

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Susan.  She was having a cup of coffee beside the Paddington Canal basin when she was  greeted by an appropriate bear.

Paddington Bear at paddington

The main business of the morning was the Common Riding church service where a presentation was made to our choirmaster and organist Henry, this year’s cornet.  We had a more than adequate replacement in the choir loft and we sang a selection a popular hymns with great gusto, and threw in a three verse introit and an anthem too.

As the congregation was much larger than usual, it would be fair to say that we made a joyful noise today.

The service started later and took longer than usual, so it took up most of the morning but the late start gave me time to wander about the garden before going to church.

It was a cloudy day and the light gave me a chance to get a good look at our St John’s Wort which is thriving uninvited in a patch in the vegetable garden

st johns wort flowers

Its cheerful berries are almost as good as its bright flowers.

st johns wort berries

The Queen of Denmark is lasting very well and adds a touch of class to the garden.

queen of denmark rose

Under the groaning plum tree, the first flowers of alstroemeria are poking their heads out.

alstromeria

…and the purple clematis nearby enjoyed a brief burst of sunshine.

purple clematis

The poppy of the day is one of those that look as though they have been made of crushed tissue paper…

red poppy

…and the white flower behind it is a sort of achillea.

achillea

I have tried and failed to get a good picture of our white astilbe but the camera finds the pink one a little more sympathetic.

pink astilbe

When we came back from church, the skies were very gloomy but Mrs Tootlepedal got busy tidying up the garden, clearing away many of the flowers that are over.  I made myself useful when I could and made a pot of coffee to keep the gardener going.

The forecast was very gloomy with heavy rain promised in the afternoon, so we didn’t make any plans.  Once again an interesting stage of the Tour de France gave us something to watch while the day got gloomier outside.  In the end though, the rain which poured down on the Open Golf in Northern Ireland, must have passed just to the north of us and it remained dry enough outside for me to have gone cycling.   As my feet were feeling the effects of yesterday’s short walk a bit, I was quite happy to put them up, and I didn’t grieve at the lost opportunity too much (or indeed, at all).

I was half thinking of an evening ride but an occasional light drizzle and the need for a visit to the shop put paid to that and day turned out to be a day of rest, very suitable to a Sunday.

The light was so poor that the most interesting thing I saw when I was looking out of the window at the birds was this phlox, growing in the bed in front of the window.

phlox through window

There were a few birds about…

siskin

…but not many.

siskin and sparrow

We are getting regular updates from London and we are very pleased to be told that our new granddaughter Evelyn, is progressing well and all is well with her parents too.

Today’s short post will make up for the excessive length of yesterday’s offering and as tomorrow’s weather seems to have a lot of rain in it, perhaps things will be quiet again.

The nearest that I could get to a flying bird of the day was this collared dove which had been flying shortly before I took its picture.

collared dove on pole

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Today’s guest picture is another from Mary Jo from Manitoba’s London visit.  This time she met one of the celebrated Tower of London ravens.

Tower of London raven

Our changeable weather is evidently tricky to predict so in spite of forecasts of gales and heavy rain, it was not a great surprise to wake up to merely a brisk breeze with dry spells.

One of the dry spells let me go up to the town after breakfast to pay in a cheque from the railway company to cover the fare for our delayed journey from London last weekend.  I would like to think that this repayment came either from a deduction from the company directors’ own pay packets or a reduction in the dividend to shareholders but I fear that that is wishful thinking.

I dropped in on the data miners at the Archive Centre, took a meter reading there and then booked the car into the garage for a look at its brakes and got home just as it started to rain once more.

After that, I stayed in, did the crossword, made some soup and grumbled.  I didn’t go out again until lunch time when it had brightened up a bit.  I took a look at the garden.

There were plucky flowers smiling through their tears to be seen.

nasturtiums

poppies

Thanks to relatively warm mornings, there are still plenty of colourful sights about, some more vibrant….

sedum, creeper and clematis

…than others.

poppies and anemone

As you can see from the anemone on the right, there was even a hint of sunshine.

The fuchsias are loving the weather, whatever the other flowers think.

fuchsia

Bees were few and far between but I did find a hoverfly on a dahlia.

dahlia with hoverfly

I was delighted to find that Lilian Austin was still in business in a modest way.

Lilian Austin

I went back in to eat my soup for lunch with no great hope for the afternoon but the sun was still out by the time that lunch was over so I set out for a walk, hoping that any clouds would blow past in the brisk wind and not rain on Langholm.

Things looked promising as I went through the park…

Park in October

There was a great heap of logs at the exit from the park….

felled trees in the park

…and it was apparent that two large trees had been felled and cut up.  I couldn’t tell whether the trees had partly fallen first and then been cut up or whether the felling was precautionary.

I walked on through the wood along the river and came out onto the track along the Murtholm…

Murtholm

…which led me to Skippers Bridge, where I went down the bank to look back at the bridge…

Skippers Bridge

….and then, trusting that the good weather would hold, I took a short diversion up the hill through the oak wood…

Oak wood

…to the Round House.

Round House

If I hadn’t been in a bit of a hurry, I might have sat on the bench there in the sunshine and enjoyed the view over the town.

Langholm from the Round House

As it was, I pressed on, enjoying the golden colour in the bracken beside the track…

bracken

…and stopping when a striking crop of fine black berries caught my eye.  When I showed the picture to Mrs Tootlepedal later on, she thought that they might be St John’s Wort….

st John's Wort

…and as I had seen some of these flowers nearby, I expect that she is right.

The river looked as though butter wouldn’t melt in its mouth when I came to cross the suspension bridge on my way home.

Esk in October

I waited for a moment or two to see if the dipper was around but it was not to be seen so I took an arty pictures of some leaves…

autumn leaves beside Esk

…and went home.  I couldn’t resist a few pictures of flowers enjoying the welcome sunshine.

daisy, calendula and dahlia

I didn’t have long to wait in as I had an appointment to get my flu jab at the health centre as well as my three-monthly vitamin B12 injection so I was soon out and back across the bridge, this time by bicycle and returned home thoroughly needled….in both senses of the word as it started to rain as I left the health centre.

Once back, I received a visit from a camera club member who had come to collect his photos from the exhibition.  He was very cheered to find that he had sold a couple of them.

Then it was time for a visit from my flute pupil Luke.  He has been practising again and it showed.  He told me that he had played with our local orchestra yesterday and found it a ‘learning experience’.  Orchestral flute playing is very tricky.  I tried it for a bit and didn’t enjoy it much so I hope he does better than I did.

After an excellent tea which had been cooked for me by Mrs Tootlepedal consisting of mince with bashed tatties and neeps from the garden, I went off to play trios with Mike and Isabel.   We had a most enjoyable play and found once again that Mozart is a cure for many ills.

When I got home, we watched a weather forecast which showed that the jet stream is currently crossing the Atlantic in a series of beautifully shaped waves, each one containing a high or a low so the changeable weather looks like a permanent fixture for the foreseeable future.  I will just have to look out my wet weather cycling gear and grit my teeth.

The flying bird of the day is in pre-flying mode.

blackbird

 

 

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Today’s guest picture shows one of the ponds in Parliament Hill Fields.  It was taken by my sister Mary who knows a good pond when she sees one.

One of the ponds in Parliament Hill Fields

There was rain in the night but we woke to a quiet, grey and dry day.  After breakfast, Mrs Tootlepedal went off to sing in church and I retired back to bed for some additional snoozing.  I got up again in time for her return and we had a cup of coffee.  That was the most exciting moment of the morning.

As I was looking for a quiet time, it was lucky that I had a large and extremely complicated Bank Holiday prize crossword to occupy me and I spent many hours during the day looking at it and not putting any answers in.

As far as I can remember, I didn’t do anything requiring actual physical endeavour until I went out into the garden to do a little dead heading and snapping just before four o’clock.

There were no coloured butterflies to be seen but the subdued light made a white butterfly easier to photograph.

white butterfly

While I  was out, the sun broke through and one of our blackbirds warmed up its behind on the roof of our neighbour’s shed.

blackbird on shed roof

The weather got to be so nice that I went for a walk.  I asked Mrs Tootlepedal if she would like to come to but she had been very busy wielding a pick axe in the process of uprooting a large fern so she was more ready for a sit down than a stroll.

The Esk looked very pretty in the sunshine when I walked along Elizabeth Street…

River esk and Town Bridge

…and once again, there were wagtails on every side.

wagtails

I walked on over the bridge and sat down on a bench to enjoy a nougat wafer from Pelosi’s ice cream van on the Kilngreen.  I was hoping to see some duck or gull action but they were not in a co-operative mood so I walked up the road, stopping to admire a  good looking St John’s Wort …

St John's Wort

…and then took the track up the hill from Whitshiels.

I kept an eye out for fungi as I walked through the woods…

fungi

…and looked at the view when I got out on the hillside.

Ewes valley

It is a view that I never tire of looking at.

As well as the hills, there was a big sky to look at too.

Ewes sky

I went up the hill past my favourite three trees.

Hollow tree

They are hollow, they have holes underneath them, they look old and rickety and they have healthy branches and leaves.  They are a model to old people just to keep going in spite of everything.

I kept going.

The open hill was sprinkled with tiny yellow flowers.

tiny yellow flowers

In spite of the overnight rain, the going was very good underfoot and when I reached the Newcastleton road, I went straight across and followed a track leading onto Whita.   I thought of climbing up to the monument but it seemed a step too far so I contoured round the hill and joined another  track leading down to the top of the golf course.

A buzzard circled high above my head…

buzzard

…and the town lay tucked in among the hills below me.

Langholm from Whita

It was a good day to be out walking, warm but not too hot and nearly windless.

When I got to the golf course, I walked down the Kirk Wynd, hoping to find interesting things to look at and brambles to pick.  There was plenty to see but the brambles were far from ripe.

bee and bramble

Kirk Wynd

I had a look at the golf course, as I always enjoy the sight of so much carefully mown grass.

Langholm Golf Club

The short ninth hole

There were a couple of golfers about to play the hole so I didn’t linger and pausing for one last look at the view…

Timpen from the Kirk Wynd

…I walked down into the town and made my way home.

Without looking at it very closely, I had bought a fillet of smoked fish yesterday when we were in Carlisle.  It was described as River Cobbler and seemed very cheap.  When I looked at the label properly today, I found to my amazement that it was a piece of farmed fish imported from Vietnam.   I had never heard of this fish before but I find that it is a species of catfish and has been the subject of trade wars between Vietnam and the USA. It has been been passed off as cod in certain fish and chip shops in the UK.  Sometimes I feel that the world is passing me by.

I used it in a kedgeree which I made for my tea and while it was edible, it wasn’t something that I will look for again.

The flower of the day is one of Mrs Tootlepedal’s many dahlias….

dahlia

…and the (just) flying bird is one of the many riverside wagtails.

wagtail

 

 

 

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Today’s guest picture, sent to me by her father, shows Matilda in a discussion on parenting showing a very fair minded effort to see both sides of the question.

Matilda

It was a warm and windless day and in spite of some disagreement from certain recalcitrant joints, I decided to make the best of it and go for a more adventurous pedal than usual.

My creaky knees meant that I wasn’t in any hurry to get going and I put off the moment of departure by looking round the garden before I left.

A scruffy blackbird was doing some much needed grooming.

blackbird

The white peonies look more gorgeous every day at the moment.

white peonies

It is not Mrs Tootlepedal’s favourite flower (she calls it a thug) but I like our cornflowers.

cornflower

I finally girded my loins and got going.  My route took me north from the town up the Esk valley and I stopped after about ten miles to admire this view….

Eskdalemuir

…and to walk down to the side of the river….

river Esk

…where I would find the Girdle Stanes, a prehistoric stone circle.

My phone is not great at picking detail out of a crowded background but here is an impression of the circle (or rather half circle as the rest has been swept away by the river).

girdle stanes
girdle stanes

This is one of seven sites that make up the Eskdale Prehistoric Trail.

Leaving the stones, I crossed the White Esk  at Eskdalemuir…

Eskdalemuir

…but only when a party of sheep had made way for me….

Sheep at Eskdalemuir

You can tell how fierce the Eskdalemiur sheep are by the fact that the shepherd has to wear a helmet.

…and headed over the hill out of the White Esk valley and down into the Black Esk valley and then up again out of that and down into Dryfesdale.

This part of the journey was going across the grain of the land but on a fine, calm day like today, it was a joy to follow the undulations of the road.

On the way over the hills, I had been listening to a lot of complaints from my left knee so I stopped and adjusted the height of my saddle by about 1 cm and this made a terrific difference to my comfort.  It is amazing how much a tiny difference in saddle height can add to or subtract from the pleasure of riding a bicycle.

The Dryfe Water took me into the market town of Lockerbie, where I hired a couple of sheep to look after my bike….

Lockerbie sheep

… while I went to purchase some of the famed Lockerbie chips for a much needed snack.  I had done about 26 miles by this time and this had included a good many hills so I was glad of the rest.

The second half of my journey was a lot flatter but to make up for this, the sun was at its height and the day got very hot and heavy so I found the flat going even harder than the hills had been in the fresher air of the morning.

Still, I battled on down to Gretna and then back through Glenzier and Canonbie to Langholm.  I passed a hive of activity at one of the drilling sites near Canonbie.

drilling

There are currently two schemes afoot, one to extract gas and the other to dig coal from the large coal field that lies beneath the green fields in this area.  I think that this rig belongs to the gas seekers.

The pictures of the ride make it look much more cloudy than it actually was and I have got quite sunburned knees after the fifty mile circuit.

Those interested may find details of the ride here.

Owing to a rather late start and the need for extensive rehydration and recovery when I got back, this effort took up most of my day but I did have some time to walk round the garden again before tea.

Frogs and blackbirds were to the fore again.

frog and blackbird

Their majesties were in good form too.

roses

Crown Princess Margaretha and the Queen of Denmark.  The queen is being pestered by flies again.

I found a more decorative tiny creature on an Iris.  I would be pleased of any reader can tell me what it is. It was very small, about 1cm long.

tiny creature

It is rare that Mrs Tootlepedal doesn’t like the look of a flower but for some reason, this St John’s Wort isn’t to her taste at all.

St John's Wort

I know what I like and this is it.

eryngium

An Eryngium just getting the first hint of its blue colour.

Two new clematis plants have come into flower.

clematis

And the Rosa Goldfinch is really doing well.

goldfinch rose

I rounded the day off with a visit to Carlisle with Susan to play with our recorder group.  All six of us were there and sometimes that is a bit overpowering in a small room but tonight we were on very good form and played sweetly and the hour and a half flashed by.  This was also a tribute to the fine selection of music from Bassano through Haydn to Fauré which our librarian Roy pulled out of his seemingly inexhaustible well of recorder part music.

There was no time to catch a flying sparrow today so a non flying complicated rose is the flower of the day.

rosa Gallica complicata

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