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Posts Tagged ‘wood pigeon’

Today’s guest picture comes from my brother Andrew.  He had a moment to wander around in Borrowash this morning and was surprised to find a giraffe in the woods.  You can see it too if you look carefully.  It didn’t move a lot, he tells me.

giraffe at Borrowash

Last night I had wondered whether we would wake to a winter wonderland or sodden slush and when the curtains opened this morning, the reality was somewhere between the two.  There had been more snow overnight and the hills had a good covering but there was still plenty of green to be seen in the garden and the roads were slushy.

The sun was shining and I thought that I ought to visit the winter wonderland and ignore the slush, so I put my walking boots on and headed for the hills.

I carefully chose our smallest hill and stopped on the way to look back over the town.  It was a good day to be out and about.

langholm and whita snow

I got a short way up the Meikleholm  Hill track and stopped to catch my breath and look around.  Sunshine on snow, if it is not too deep, brings out details and I could see a fan shape near a pylon on the lower sloped of Whita across the the other side of the town.

pylon in snow

A glimpse of some snowy hills encouraged me to climb a bit higher…

view from Meikleholm Hill

…but I met the  owner of these footprints and he told me that it was very cold and windy on the top of the hill…

strange footsteps

…and as it was clouding over and the forecast had suggested a good chance of more snow, I chickened out and walked back down off the hill and onto the Becks track.  I settled for a walk across the Becks Burn and back home by the road.  I hoped that I would get back before the snow started again.

My friend Ada had sent me message a day or two ago to say that primroses were out along the track so I kept my eyes open and saw one for myself.  Shortly afterwards I passed a fine display of catkins.

primrose and catkins

I got down to the Auld Stane Brig and thought about heading home along the road.

But the clouds had moved away and the sun was out again, so I thought that I might have time to climb up the lower slopes of Warbla and come back down the track to the park to make my walk a little more interesting.

I wasn’t the only one to have used the track today…

warbla path

…and this was no surprise as dog walkers get everywhere.

This short track was quite steep and even a little snow makes walking harder work and I was happy to stop and look back across the Wauchope from time to time.

The light on Calfield Rig was interesting.

calfield rig

And I could have stood for a long time looking at the snowy slopes…

calfield

…but it was chilly so I walked up the path a bit and then had another look in a different direction.  The light and shade there were interesting too.

view over holmwood snow

I got to the point where my path met the main track from the top of Warbla and turned to go down to the town. Then I turned back and looked up the track to the summit.

warbla track snow

It was irresistible so I telephoned Mrs Tootlepedal to tell her of my whereabouts and then set off up the hill.

It was quite hard to make quick progress as I had to keep stopping to look around, both to enjoy the wider view as sunshine and clouds alternated in a brisk wind…

clouds and sun on snow

…and to use the zoom on the Lumix to focus in on small details that caught the eye on distant hills.  There was some deep snow on Bauchle Hill further up the Esk valley.

detail Bauchle Hill

I pressed on though, using the helpful footprints in the snow left by a pair of dog walkers who had gone up the track before me.  Without the help of the dog walkers, I don’t think that I could have continued as the wind had blown quite a bit of snow onto the track and it was well over six inches deep at times.  I would have skipped through that as a boy but it was a more serious consideration now.

Still, I got high enough to look back down over the town….

wide view from warbla snow

…and as I got to the flatter part of the track near the summit, the snow got thinner because much of it had been blown away by the strong winds and I was able to stride out with youthful exuberance (almost).

The views from the top were well worth any effort I had had to expend in getting up the hill.

ewes valley snow

Thanks to the rapid passing of the clouds, the light was different every time I looked and it would have been very tempting to spend quite a bit of time on the top of the hill taking pictures…

langholm sun and clouds snow

…but as you can see from the snow glued to the trig point, the wind was brisk and the windchill factor was enough to make standing around for too long unattractive…

trig point warbla

…quite apart from the possibility of being literally blown over while taking pictures of Whita.

whita from warbla snow

So I took one last picture….

Langholm and ewes valley snow

…looked at some looming clouds coming up behind me, and scuttled back down the hill as fast as my legs (and two stout walking poles) would carry me.

As it turned out, there was no need for a rush as the snow didn’t start again until well into the afternoon.  But I had had the best of the day’s sunshine while I was out on the hill so I was happy.

I was also happy to sit down for some lunch after a strenuous four and a half mile outing.

I had a quick look at the birds in a sunny moment after lunch.

The pigeon was back…

pigeon

…and when the snow started again, the siskins were queuing up to kick…

three siskins and a kicking

…and shout at each other.

three siskins and a dunk

I settled down to the computer and put in some useful time entering more of the newspaper index into the Langholm Archive Group database and learning songs for a choir competition when we will have to do without books.

Mrs Tootlepedal found a dry spell to cycle about the town, combining some business with some shopping and when she go back, she made an excellent chicken stew for our tea.

We should be going to Edinburgh tomorrow to see Matilda but with more snow forecast, I think it most likely that we will stay at home.

The flying birds of the day are that flock of siskins which was back again.  They love to perch on the walnut tree, leap into the air, swirl about a bit and then settle back in the tree.  Perhaps, like me, they get a bit cold if they have to stand around too long.

siskin flock in walnut

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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Mary who was cheered up by a bit of brightness at Coal Drops Yard on a very gloomy day at Kings Cross.

Coal Drop Wharf

We were cheered up on another very gloomy day here by a lively performance from the Sunday Club children at our church service this morning.  This was followed by a baptism so it was a service for the future and with well over 100 people in the church, the future looked as though it might just be all right.

When we got home, there was time for a cup of coffee and a check on the birds.

A goldfinch and a sparrow arrived at the feeder from different sides.

goldfinch sparrow oanel

Then siskins appeared…

siskins on feeder

…and a goldfinch made an exit.

goldfinch leaving

Having looked at the forecast, we decided to have a late lunch and get a walk in while the going was good, so we put on our walking shoes, said goodbye to a pigeon on the drive…

pigeon in garden

…and set off through the park towards the Kernigal.

Some little white fungus on an old tree stump caught my eye as we walked along the Stubholm track….

whiefungus

…and I thought that a mossy branch was the equal of many pieces of sculpture that I have seen in art galleries.

mossy branch

As always, I kept an eye for lichen and was pleased to see this colourful clump just before we got to the wood…

fruting lichen

…which was looking quite majestic in the misty conditions.

misty woods kernigal

We followed the mountain bike path through the trees and it was too dark to see much.

Only another crop of white fungus stood out and even that needed a flash to capture it.

white fingus kernigal

When we got out of the thick wood, we thought that we were going to get rained on but it was only drops from branches overhead….

drops on twigs kernigal

…and we were able to follow the path back down to the river without getting wet.

track to skipperscleuch

It was rather a damp scene all the same.

warbla misty view

I thought that this tree, against a drab background and with a fallen branch at its foot, summed up the day well.

 

Tree with fallen branch

On the plus side, it was well above freezing and there was no wind, so walking was a pleasure and incidental treats like these very glossy beech leaves kept us interested as we went along.

shiny beech leaves

We crossed Skippers Bridge and walked back beside the river towards the town.

I enjoyed seeing the fence lichen in magnificent form and Mrs Tootlepedal pointed out a teasel, a rare thing in this part of the country.

lichen and teazle

We called at the Co-op to get something for our late lunch and as we were walking along the narrow path behind the Dyehouse, I noticed a couple of birds ahead of us.  At first I thought that they were just rather colourful chaffinches but as we got nearer…

bullfinch panel

…we could see that they were bullfinches and that there were three of them.

One of them stopped and stared for long enough for me to get the zoom working but it was a good way ahead of us…

bullfinch in tree

…and then they played a most amusing game.

I had the shopping in a bag.  They stopped on a bush, waited until I had put the shopping down and got my camera out and then they flew on.  As the light was so poor, I needed to get quite close to them to get a decent shot, so I picked up my bag and followed after them.  As soon as I started walking, they stopped, I put down my bag, got out the camera and they flew on again.

This went on for quite some time and even Mrs Tootlepedal had to agree that it looked very much as though they were just tormenting me on purpose.

Dyehouse path

What the bullfinches were looking for were the seeds on these plants…

bullfinch eating seeds

….and they stopped long enough once or twice for me to get blurred shots.  When they got fed up with laughing at me, they flew back over our heads and doubtless waited for another passer-by to tease.

The forecast got it bang on and it had just started to rain as we got home and that concluded the outdoor part of our day.

We had a late lunch and whiled away the rest of the day in reading the newspapers and conversation.  After a while, Mrs Tootlepedal started to listen to an interesting radio programme on jackdaws and rooks and I went off to catch up with my correspondence on the computer.

The winter solstice arrived at 4am today and the TV weatherman told us that tomorrow our day will be one second longer.  We are very excited by this and are planning to make full use of the extra second when it comes.

We had a mince pie each after our evening meal and felt quite festive. Then we watch the final episode of His Dark Materials. Both of us were more or less completely baffled about what was going on.  I await the next series with impatience in the hope that some explanation will be given.  Perhaps if we had read the books it would have helped.

The fuzzy flying bird of the day is a siskin.

flying siskin

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In lieu of any new material, I have returned to Venetia’s  trip to Madeira for the guest picture of the day.  Somewhere between the mountains and the sea, she passed through this narrow gap.

Madeira

Being Friday, I had made an arrangement to have coffee and treacle scones with Dropscone.  The forecast for the afternoon was rather dubious so I had made a vague plan with myself to get up early and go for a bicycle ride before coffee.  I didn’t have any great confidence in the plan but much to my amazement, I did in fact get up early and cycled 20 miles before breakfast.

The wind had dropped since yesterday but there was still quite enough of it (and from an unhelpful direction) to keep my head down so I didn’t see a lot more than the road in front of my nose.   However, just at the highest point of the trip, I was going so slowly that I had time to notice a good crop of yellow rattle…

yellow rattle

…and stopped to take a picture.

Mrs Tootlepedal had also got up early and was hard at work in the garden when I got back, tidying up unruly plants and picking up debris from yesterday’s strong winds.

I lent a hand by shredding what I could of the material and then and took the opportunity to admire a couple of yellow roses.

Crown Princess Margareta

Crown Princess Margareta, a long time resident of the garden

golden wedding rose

And a newcomer.  This little rose came in a presentation pot from a friend as a present for our golden wedding and has now found a home in the garden.

The coffee and scones were well up to standard and Dropscone was very cheerful because he had been part of a golf team which had recently come second in a competition.  He went off to play more golf and I mowed the middle lawn and took more pictures.

There were quite a few bees about but they were concentrating on a few plants, the hydrangea, a martagon lily and nectaroscordum.

bees

The nectarosordum proved very popular and there were still bees visiting it several hours later.

It was pleasing to see that the peonies had survived the wind and the rain very well indeed.

peony

New flowers have come out to join them.

clematis

Another clematis by the front door.

campanula

The first of many campanulas

moss rose

A moss rose

perennial nasturtium

A perennial nasturtium

Although it is not new, I couldn’t pass by the pale astrantia without clicking the shutter finger as it was looking superb.

astrantia

Over lunch, I took time to watch the birds.  The feeder was busy….

busy feeder

…and I had to fill it twice today.

busy feeder (2)

Doves and pigeons came to cast their beady eyes on fallen seeds.

dove and pigeon

And sparrows flew this way and that.

flying sparrows

There was more shredding to do after lunch as Mrs Tootlepedal had kept busy and then I mowed the front lawn.  The forecast rain stayed away so I went off for a walk.

There were lots of wild flowers (and a rabbit) to look at as I went round Easton’s and Gaskell’s walks.

Eastons and gaskells

I would welcome suggestions as to what the very small yellow flower is

The wind had torn a lot of leaves from the trees and you can see in the top right panel above that one section of the walk was carpeted by the results.

The summer growth is in full swing on Gaskell’s Walk…

gaskell's

…and I found geums, hawkbit with friends and ragged robin beside the path.

wild flowers

There was reedy grass and the first bramble flowers too.

grass and bramble

I wasn’t unobserved as I walked past a field at the Stubholm.

watching sheep

Several days ago, my neighbour Liz told me a story about finding a host of flies on the gate at the end of Gaskell’s Walk.  I didn’t have an opportunity to check the gate out and had forgotten all about it until I came to the gate today…..

flies on gaskells gate

…and found the flies were still there.  They were quite alive and flew off when I got too close.  You might wonder what they would find so attractive on the metal bar of a gate.

I was just going to take a truly wonderful picture of the Auld Stane Brig when my camera battery unexpectedly gave up so you will just have to take my word about the picture and for the fact that I passed two unicorns on my way home.   It was a bit annoying as I had put in a fresh battery before I set out and can only assume that I had failed to switch the charger on.

The sun was out and it was a very nice afternoon by the time that I got home and Mrs Tootlepedal and I sat on the new bench and enjoyed the sights and smells of the garden before going in for a cup of tea.

I watched the birds again and saw a young greenfinch falling off its perch at the feeder.

greenfinch

You don’t often see birds falling off a perch.

Mrs Tootlepedal cooked a healthy meal with spinach and broccoli for our tea.  I am eating so much iron rich food that if it rains a lot, I feel I may be in danger of going rusty.

In the evening, Mike and Alison came round and while Mike and Mrs Tootlepedal chatted, Alison and I played music.  Several of the notes were in the right place, at the right time and in the right key.  We enjoyed ourselves.

The flower of the day is another of my favourite peonies.

peony (2)

 

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from my sister Mary who went to Margate to visit the Turner Gallery, which can be seen in the background of her  shot.

Margate sands with Turner Contemporary Art Gallery in the distance

I had the job of being the stand in feeder filler at the Moorland bird hide today and it was dry but chilly when I drove up to the feeding station.  The roads were very icy in places so I went with great care.

I filled the feeders and sat in the hide for a while, enjoying the busy comings and goings of the residents.

The chaffinches went for the tall feeder….

chaffinches

…while blackbirds and siskins preferred a little shelter from possible raptors…

siskins and blackbirds

…and the tits went nuts.

tit collection

I tried to catch one of each of the resident tit varieties.  This is a great tit…

great tit

 

….this is a coal tit…..

coal tit

…and this is a blue tit.

blue tit

We get long tailed tits around the town too but I have never seen any at the Moorland feeders.

As I sat there, I noticed that it had begun to snow and since I thought that the roads were quite tricky enough already, when the snow started to come down more seriously, I upped sticks and went home.

It didn’t take long before we were back to this again…

snowy garden

….so I settled down to work on my computer indoors for the rest of the day.

I put a couple of parish magazines, which Sandy had formatted for me, into the Archive Group website and checked on a couple of other things while I was there.

Then I caught up on my correspondence and turned my attention to hymns.  I have recently joined the church choir and since I don’t know the bass parts, I find it very awkward to put the music and words together for hymns, especially when the music is on one page and the words are on another.  As a result, I am experimenting with producing my own versions with music and words as close together as is possible to see if this helps.

Outside, the workers on the dam bridge seemed to be packing up although the work is by no means complete.  At one stage, a large lorry appeared and removed the container that they had been using as office and canteen.

dam bridge repairs

They were very brisk an efficient and had it swung up and on the back of the truck in no time.  The next time that I looked out, I caught a last glimpse of it as it went off down Henry Street at the bottom of our road.

dam bridge repairs

We are interested to see what is going to happen next.

In the early evening, Peter from our camera club turned up and we spent a frustrating three quarters of an hour unavailingly trying to get one or other of my laptops to talk to his projector via an HDMI cable.  There were plenty of suggested solutions available on the internet but sadly, none of them worked.  Such are the joys of tech.

On a more cheerful note, we switched off the computers and went off to sing with Langholm Sings, our local community choir where Peter is one of the tenors.  We are preparing for a concert with our local orchestra and as a result, we are singing a lot of songs which we know quite well.  This makes for a relaxing evening.

The forecast suggests that we might get a better day after a wet start tomorrow.  I hope so.

There was an almost complete absence of birds in the garden today for some unknown reason so the flying bird(s) of the day come from the Moorland feeders and are the best that I could do on a gloomy day.

Moorland feeder in snow

There was at least one walking bird about in the garden though.

footprints in the snow

It was almost certainly a wood pigeon.

 

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Today’s guest picture comes from my friend Marjorie’s holiday in Yorkshire.  She tells me that she had to climb 107 steps to get to the top of a lighthouse to get this view of Flamborough Head yesterday.

Flamborough Head

I am not sleeping as well as I would like at the moment so I was happy to have a very idle morning while Mrs Tootlepedal went off to a church choir practice.

I watched the birds for a bit…

…and some of the birds watched me.

blue tit and goldfinch

There are still a lot of dunnocks about and because they don’t fly onto the feeder I have been neglecting them a bit.  Here is one with the only great tit that I saw all day.

dunnock and great tit

It is hard to miss the coal tits and blue tits as they come in a constant stream all day.

coal tit and blue tit

There haven’t been many blackbirds about lately since all the rowan berries were eaten but the occasional one drops by.

blackbird

I got a good look at two other birds, one an old friend….

robin

…and the other an occasional visitor.

wood pigeon

I noticed while I was looking out of the window that there was a flower near the feeders which I have never photographed.

I went out to have a look at it. Mrs Tootlepedal tells me that it is a heuchera,

Heuchera

It was a bit cooler today but the forecast said that it was set fair so I had an early lunch and set out for my standard 20 mile pedal down to Canonbie and back.  It started to rain when I was three miles out which was a surprise but I persevered and luckily the rain didn’t so I was soon happily going along in the dry again.

I stopped in Canonbie to take a picture of the Cross Keys, an old coaching inn in the village.

Cross keys, Canonbie

The quiet road road that I was on used to be the main road from Carlisle to Edinburgh not so long ago.  The inn has lost a lot of passing trade.

While I was in stopping mode, I stopped at Byreburnfoot on the far side of the village to have another look at the fine crop of fungus beside the road. There were dozens.

fungus

I couldn’t help having a quick look up the river while I was there.

Byreburnfoot colour

I stopped on Hollows Bridge to check the view but it seemed much the same as when I was last there so after a quick look back at the bridge…

Hollows Bridge

A wide and handsome bridge for the handful of cars and the occasional cyclist that use it now.

… I pedalled on home.

I had thought of going for a walk in search of fungus when I got back but I found Attila the Gardener engaged on a big task and I thought it only proper to lend a hand.

She had pruned an old azalea and was digging round the roots prior to moving it to a new place.

Azalea move

With a good deal of delving, levering and heaving, the bush was dislodged and hauled to its new home.

Mrs Tootlepedal filled the new hole with compost and bonemeal and watered the plant in very thoroughly but the azalea is old and has had some rough treatment in its move so only time will tell if it will be back in business next spring.  I hope so becuase it has been the star of many a photo in the past.

yellow azalea

The bush may not look like a big thing to shift but it was pretty heavy and we were pleased to have managed the move and more than happy to retire inside for a rest afterwards.

A dahlia caught my eye on the way in.

dahlia

My flute pupil Luke is having a holiday in Edinburgh so I had time to get my music in order for the choir concert in Carlisle tomorrow before it was time for tea.

After tea, I went off to play trios with Mike and Isabel.  We spent some time making initial progress with a new Mozart trio and were able to work through the first two movements at a modest pace.  Quite a bit more work will be needed before the composer might recognise his own work but it is a very enjoyable way to spend some time and effort.

The flower of the day is two nasturtiums….

nasturtiums

…and the flying bird is a chaffinch approaching the feeder cautiously.

chaffinch

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Today’s guest picture comes from a Canadian correspondent, Mary Jo.  She thinks perhaps their weather is worse than ours by some way and if the evidence of a chokecherry  tree blown over is anything to go by, she is quite right.

fence before

We were promised some wet weather here today but like so many promises recently, this turned out not be the case and the rain has been postponed until tomorrow.  In fact, the day turned out to be pretty good, if rather windy.

It didn’t matter to me in the morning as I was in the Information Hub on the High Street but not giving out information as there were no visitors asking for any.  Luckily there is plenty to read in the newspapers at the moment so I put the two hours in without getting bored.

Once I was back home, it seemed like a good idea to do as much work in the garden as we could while it was still fine so I did quite a bit of mowing before lunch and after lunch, Mrs Tootlepedal and I finished the trimming of the box balls round the front lawn.

Box balls

After all the recent hedge and ball trimming, there was a heap of cut stuff to be dealt with so we got the petrol shredder out and put the whole lot through it in quick time.  Most of the result is resting comfortably in compost Bin A now.

Compost

Once this task was over, I had time to wander round the garden looking at flowers. They were enjoying the sunshine too.

peony, geum and Icelandic poppy

The Icelandic poppy on the right was looking particularly cheery so perhaps it knew what was going to happen later in the day.

There are a lot of Martagon lilies getting ready to flower and this one was the first in the race.

Martagon lily

As well as our large ox-eye daisies, we have a clump of smaller daisies too.

small daisies

And if you want even smaller but perfectly formed flowers there is a Cotoneaster in the back border which provides just that.

cotoneaster

The pushing of the mower and the bending and stretching with the trimmer was more than enough exercise for the day and a short rain shower, just as I might have been considering a walk, confirmed that watching Wimbledon on the telly would be the best thing to do so I did it.

I did find time to look out of the window as well.

Siskins were very busy…

siskins

…as were the sparrows.

sparrows

Other birds took on the role of spectators.

They were small…

redpoll

Redpoll

…medium….

blackbird

Blackbird

…and large.

Jackdaw and wood pigeon

Jackdaw and wood pigeon

The jackdaws were interested in the some peanuts which I had put out on the bench beside the feeders.

jackdaws

In the evening, I inadvertently found a channel that was showing the England vs Iceland football match in the European Championship. I hadn’t meant to watch the game but in the end, I watched enthralled as highly paid players failed to pass the ball to each with any great precision or purpose and when they did get near goal, managed to kick the ball anywhere but in the direction of the  net and this let plucky Iceland (pop 330,000) beat England (pop 53,000,000) by two goals to one..

These things happen but at least the footballers can console themselves with the thought that they have managed to get out of Europe a lot more quickly and cleanly and with less fuss than the politicians are going to be able to do.

On an incidental note: since Iceland had beaten the Czech Republic, Turkey, Holland and Latvia in the qualifying rounds, perhaps the result should not have come as quite such a surprise to the expert commentators as it seemed to.

The flower of the day is the Lilian Austin rose, at its most expansive just before the inevitable decline sets in.

Lilian Austin

And the flying bird of the day is one of the busy siskins.

siskin flying

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Today’s guest picture was provided by my brother.  He thinks there should be a counterbalance to the many white lambs which have appeared in the blog lately.  He saw these diverse lambs on a walk in the Peak Distract.

manifold lambs

We had another cold and (very) windy day today so I was pleased that my banked cycling mileage for the month would let me take a day off without feeling guilty about it.

It was brightened by the appearance of Dropscone and Sandy for coffee.  Dropscone had been shopping so there were no scones but I was able to plug the gaps with a combination of iced buns and mini Jaffa cakes so we didn’t starve.

After coffee, I sat down to make the most of the morning by putting a week of the newspaper index into the Archive Group database but suffered the first frustration of the day when I couldn’t access the server to put the data in.  This has happened before and cured itself so I am hoping that it might do so again. (It hadn’t by the end of the day.)

The enforced rest allowed me to spend more time than lately in staring out of the window.  There was plenty to look at.

siskin and goldfinch

A siskin and goldfinch having a discussion

The birds looked as though they were feeling the cold a bit, not to mention the brisk wind.

goldfinches

But occasional shafts of sunshine cheered things up a bit.

goldfinches

We certainly have a lot of goldfinches about at present

After lunch, the wind didn’t get any less intrusive…

wood pigeon

Not a happy looking wood pigeon

…but the sun arrived to pick out a redpoll in all its glory.

redpoll

The wind was still nippy though

redpoll

And in a moment of almost transcendental joy, it also let me finish turning the contents of Bin C into Bin D.

compost

Have you ever seen anything more exciting?

And then I had time for a garden wander.  There is plenty of colour about even if spring is creeping along very slowly indeed.

April flowers

And useful insects too.

insect of daffodil

bee on tulip

This bee couldn’t find a way into the tulip and banged round the side for some time.

The first tulips are starting to go over but they still have the capacity to delight.

tulips

The sun was a cause of  frustration though as it came out at the same time as I had an appointment to visit the physio so I couldn’t make the best of it with a walk.

On the plus side, the visit to the physio was very helpful.  She was pleased with my progress and had useful suggestions for further action and will see me again in a month for a further check.  I walked back home with a spring in my step.

After a cup of tea, I had a moment to look out of the window again.

collared dove

A collared dove paid us a visit

I thought though, that this picture of a chaffinch among the rather scanty plum blossom summed up the day best.

chaffinch

I still had time to go for a walk but I foolishly thought that I ought to try to get some sense out the Archive Group power suppliers as they had not written me the promised letter of explanation after a month of waiting.  This was not a life affirming experience and not only am I no nearly a satisfactory conclusion to my problems but it took so long that I hadn’t time for a walk.

Luckily my flute pupil Luke came to cheer me up with some excellent playing and good signs of progress.  He is a really good lad and I get great pleasure out of our duets.

A final moment of frustration to round off the day came when I got a message from the website hosting company suggesting a solution to my database problems.  It was good to get a helpful suggestion from people who know but the fact that it didn’t work modified my rapture severely.  I will see if my younger son can help me out.  He knows about these things.

The flying bird of the day is one of the flock of goldfinches.

flying goldfinch

 

 

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